Using Albums in a Facebook Group

I love my Facebook group, Ashlee Brotzell Designs.

I created it just over a year ago when I started designing crochet patterns. As a designer I suddenly wasn’t allowed to post in a lot of the groups I was in. It was, and still is, a bit of a sore spot. It makes me sad not being able to contribute to a conversation on a topic I love simply because I love it so much that I decided to create my own patterns.

So, now I have my own group where I can post everything I am working on. I also have a Facebook page and an instagram page and a ravelry group, but I am most active in the Facebook group.

Besides being a great place to see my newest patterns as they come out and sometimes see a sneak peak of things before they come out, it is also a great place to get advice on yarn choices or meet some new friends who love crocheting too!

I have created albums for most of my patterns so you can see a few color options and sometimes see the difference between the two techniques all my patterns are written for: interlocking crochet and overlay mosaic crochet.

But, it seems that these albums are not as easy to use as one would hope.

Mobile / Tablet

One issue is that the screens look different based on whether you are accessing the group on your desktop/laptop or on a mobile device like your smartphone or tablet.

This is is how I access the albums on my phone:

Choose, “More”, “View Group Info”, “Photos”, and then choose an album.

Choose the three dots, “More” and from the drop-down menu, choose “View Group Info”

Choose “Photos” (the number of photos in the group will probably keep increasing!)

Here are a list of albums! You have to scroll down and choose to load more if you want to see earlier designs. I find that slightly difficult on my phone actually. It is easier on the desktop.

When you choose an album you will see the description I have given the album and you may notice that the comments are all turned off but you can still add your own photos!

Comments are turned off on the albums, but you can click on an individual image and comment on that image. In the album description, I try to put the links to my blog post about each pattern and sometimes also the ravelry or etsy link. Those links can also be found in my blog post, so the information is kind of everywhere.

Desktop

The steps are basically the same on my laptop, but the screen looks a bit different. Also, your screen might be slightly different because you aren’t the admin so I am pretty sure I have some extra things that you can’t see.

Choose, “More” from the menu bar, then choose “Media” from the drop down menu. Select “Albums” instead of seeing all the photos at once, and then choose an album!

Choose “More” from the menu bar. It will have a drop down menu – choose “Media”. I tried to screenshot with the menu visible but I am apparently not that technologically advanced.

In “Media” you have the option of seeing all the photos or you can choose “Albums” to see some organization,

You may have to scroll down to see older designs. Some albums are bundled to include more than one design – for example, all of the gnomes are in one album.

Once you’ve selected an album you will see that comments are turned off but there’s a blue button that says “Add Photos/Videos”. Plus, if you click on a photo in an album you can leave a comment for the maker there!

I hope this helps! I sometimes forget to create an album for my new patterns, but eventually I get it done. *embarassed grin*

Remember, you can find a list of all my patterns here: ashleeslint.com/patterns

Most of my patterns are on Ravelry (a few of the Dr Who ones are not).

Some of my patterns are on Etsy (let me know if you need something on a non-ravelry platform).

And all of my social links are here: linktr.ee/LFMandMosaic

Mosaic Locked Double Crochet

This is a quick photo tutorial on locking in those stitches when you have long stretches of double crochets in a mosaic crochet pattern. Most of my patterns are not created with long stretches – but as I grow and create more things I have introduced a few small pieces where this could help.

To prevent the small flaps on the back of your work, consider locking-in your stitch.

Begin like a dropped double crochet: skip the next stitch, and work into the Front Loop of the stitch in the row below; yarn over, insert hook into front loop below (see first image below), pull up a loop, yarn over, pull through two loops, insert hook into back loop of skipped stitch (see second image below), yarn over and pull through all three loops on your hook.

~Yarn over, insert hook into front loop 2 rows down (then yarn over, pull up a loop, yarn over, pull through 2 loops)~
~After completing first half of the double crochet (US), insert hook into back loop of stitch usually skipped, yarn over and pull through all 3 loops.~

This extra step is optional but I like how the back stays smooth. You can lock in every other stitch if you prefer.

Tropical Tree: Colorful Square in both techniques

I crocheted this palm tree square with a colorful background in both of my favorite techniques: interlocking crochet and overlay mosaic crochet.

One of the things I love about interlocking crochet is that you get a fabulous image without using bobbins or tying and weaving in ends. I did a single crochet graphgan once (see it here), and although it is definitely beautiful to look at, the amount of work involved made it stressful at times.

The simplicity of a two-toned image without tangled yarn balls and 10 more hours of work after you’re “done” is one of the main benefits of my Locked Filet Mesh patterns (LFM = interlocking crochet).

But, I also love how colorful the mosaic patterns can be! Since you are cutting the yarn at the end and joining at the beginning of each row it is really easy to simply grab another color.

The biggest challenge is just to make sure the main color and accent color (or contrasting color) are not too similar. If the colors blend together too much you won’t see the image your yarn is trying to create.

All that being said, this pattern includes instructions on changing colors every few rows. It creates the beachy feel and I think it is worth the effort of weaving in tails (with interlocking crochet). The mosaic version can just use a nice envelope border like usual.

You can grab Tropical Tree on Ravelry. It is just a 20-window square and will join nicely with other 10-inch squares, like my flamingo! See my list of other patterns of this size here: www.ashleeslint.com/patterns#medium

As usual, the back looks striped when done with the overlay mosaic technique and has an almost reverse image when done using interlocking.

I don’t usually change colors with my interlocking patterns so I included a short explanation in the pattern.

I cut and tied off the first color and then joined my new color with a slip knot. More specifically, I put a slip knot on my hook, put it into the stitch I was just working with and pulled a loop up and through the slip knot to make its own slip stitch.

I kept my instagram feed up to date with my progress while crocheting 😉 check it out: instagram.com/ashleeslint

Flamingo Pattern and Locking-in Mosaic Crochet Stitches

I hope you can feel the tropical vibes when you look at this pattern!

I think the colors I used in my overlay mosaic version are a bit more tropical than my interlocking crochet sample.

I was using up scrap yarn when I did the mosaic square so it isn’t exactly how I originally imagined it to be but I am pleased nonetheless. And I used some leftover bulky yarn for the Locked Filet Mesh (LFM / interlocking) sample but without another item for size reference you can’t actually tell in the photos above.

I did submit this pattern to a magazine but I didn’t even get a rejection letter 🙃 I guess they had enough patterns from other amazing designers. It was supposed to be done using fingering weight (8/4, 2 – fine, 4-ply, etc) and be a coaster.

You can get your copy of my Flamingo on ravelry! I may put together a bundle of squares for Etsy later.

The chart is 41 x 41, which means this is a 20-window square when done using the interlocking crochet technique. You can find other squares of this size here and join them together for a custom blanket!

~Interlocking crochet, wrong side~

I used grey as my Main Color (MC) for the interlocking sample because I wanted the pink to be more visible. If you’d rather see a pink flamingo then you need to start with pink!

You may also notice, when comparing the two techniques, that the mosaic flamingo is solid (unlike the background which has “dots” all over the place). I have only attached one chart to this pattern, it has a solid flamingo; when you read the chart for interlocking crochet you skip every other square so your finished flamingo will look like my sample.

The “dots” are created naturally when doing interlocking crochet and I like that they lock in the stitches and use less yarn when doing mosaic crochet. My solid flamingo creates small flaps on the wrong side.

~Upside down, and wrong side, to show the flaps~

I don’t particularly like the small flaps.

I have included the following instructions in the mosaic pattern:

Optional “Locked Double Crochet”

To prevent the small flaps on the back of your work, consider locking-in your stitch.

Begin like a dropped double crochet: skip the next stitch, and work into the Front Loop of the stitch in the row below; yarn over, insert hook into front loop below (see first image below), pull up a loop, yarn over, pull through two loops, insert hook into back loop of skipped stitch (see second image below), yarn over and pull through all three loops on your hook.

~After completing first half of the double crochet (US), insert hook into back loop of stitch usually skipped, yarn over and pull through all 3 loops.~

This extra step is optional but I like how the back stays smooth. You can lock in every other stitch if you prefer.

I can’t wait to see your color combinations! I have included the color for each row in the mosaic version but you, of course, can treat that information as a suggestion and not a hard-and-fast rule.

Knitting Machine: Introduction and Child-led “Tutorial”

I ordered this knitting machine in November. It was supposed to arrive by December 10. I have FINALLY received it (Jan 16!) and it is an actual “Sentro” (a lot of people seem to be receiving various brands).

Of course, I had to interrupt my current work in progress to play with my new toy!

I *should* be finishing this square, not learning a new toy / skill

The box was quite beat up and the Styrofoam inside was crumbled. I was pretty nervous it would be broken. But, other than not having yarn in the box (like advertised) it seems to be perfectly fine!

My daughter helped me as we learned how to cast on and keep tension. She also learned NOT to turn the knob the wrong way… 🙈 I had to learn how to pick up stitches anyway.

She has created a tutorial for you!

YouTube video

As you can tell, she is very excited! And, after a few restarts, she created a beautiful hat!

Focus on her happy face and not my laundry lol

I stayed up late to make this blue hat, and I am so happy with how it came out! I just used up the whole ball. It is 3.5 oz of superwash wool from Loops and Threads (Washable Wool Stripes). It made 103 rows on my 48 pin machine, which, as it turns out, is pretty much the perfect size!

My bestie bought me a few grab bags when Michaels was having a clearance sale and I think there were 7 or 8 of these balls in 3 different colorways. So, it looks like I will be making at least 7-8 hats. 🤣

I need to get back to working on my valentine’s day project. I had hoped to publish this a month before valentine’s day but it is already January 18 so I missed my made-up deadline. Sorry.

I do not seem to balance “work” with “work” very well. I have computer work (drawing patterns, turning them into patterns you can understand, advertising, publishing on Etsy and Ravelry, etc) and I have crochet work (I have not crocheted all of my patterns, but I do have a lot of yarn to use up and I know that you guys like seeing the patterns in yarn-form plus I always need a yarn picture to post on my Instagram page and keep that current and engaging).

Plus, there is my actual life-priority: my family.

So, it is a learning experience. For me. I am always learning how to best do this or that and how to balance and stay sane. I hope you are staying sane too!

Among Us – turning a hat into a character

So, if you live under a rock, you may not have seen any of these “Among Us” toys, hats, etc. I admit, it took me longer than most to figure out why everyone kept using the phrase “sus”.

My bestie asked me to make her son a stuffy and a hat.

I *mostly* followed a pattern I found online for the little amigurumi guy. I couldn’t get the eye… goggle… face thing? I don’t know what it is, but mine wasn’t working so I had to free hand it a bit.

There are lots of free patterns out there, make sure you do use a FREE one because the creators of Among Us have been clear about their wishes: read about that here.

So, here is my little guy:

See his little wolf ears? Special request. I did 3 chains in a magic circle, then 2 single crochets in each stitch around (6). I then did one more round of sc. Flatten and sew on.

The pattern I followed made weird goggles so I kind if squished and shaped them into something I liked better.

Then I made a hat. A basic beanie.

For the matching wolf ears I had to do a lot more than 3 rounds lol

For these big wolf ears I started with 4 single crochets in a magic circle. Increase all the way around (that means put 2 sc in each stitch).

I didn’t join the rows, I was just working in rounds, so make sure you grab a stitch marker!

3rd round: repeat *sc, inc* (12)

4: repeat *2 sc, inc* (16)

5: repeat *inc, 3 sc* (20) (I moved the increase to avoid a spiral line)

6: repeat *4 sc, inc* (24)

7: repeat * 2 sc, inc, inc, 8 sc* (26)

8: repeat *inc, 12 sc* (28)

9 sc around. Cut and tie off. Leave a long tail for sewing.

Flatten the cone into an ear. Make sure you curve it strongly. Use stitch markers to place both ears on the hat before sewing.

You want them to match up! And you don’t want to have to cut your work off and redo it.

The goggle part on the hat is a 2D item instead of 3D like on the little amigurumi.

To make an oval:

Chain 17, sc in 2nd from hook and across (16).

Don’t turn your work, sc in each stitch along the bottom of your work (+ 16, 32 for this round).

Round 3: increase (put 2 sc in the same stitch), sc x14, inc in both of the next 2 stitches, sc 14, inc.

Round 4: inc, inc, sc x 14, inc x 3, sc 14, inc. Cut and tie off, leave a long tail for sewing.

Give it a try!

CAL Prizes

What is so amazing about a CAL (Crochet-A-Long)?

Is it the camaraderie? Is it the pressure to keep up with the schedule (so that you can *finally* finish a project?) Is is the free aspect (not all CALs are free though)?

I learned that, sometimes, it is about the prizes!

I don’t have a big contract with a yarn company or a yarn magazine or anything like that. So, my prizes may not be able to compete with other CALs. But, that also means your competition is smaller! So, perhaps, you may have a higher chance of winning!

It is the first week of my Abstract Queen CAL (you can see the main post here)(or just go directly to the interlocking or mosaic pages).

It has been great to see so many people sharing their progress in my Facebook group!

I did a little write up about how to create a project on Ravelry. And perhaps I didn’t advertise it well enough because there were not many entries in the first week’s draw!

Each new release happens on Tuesday, so Monday evening I will check the Ravelry projects and pick a winner from the projects that have been updated. I don’t want to disclude those that have less time for crocheting, so I won’t require that you stay caught up to the CAL, I just need to see some progress and you will be entered!

The first week’s prize, won by Kimberly, was a choice between the Abstract Queen pattern or a $5 coupon to my Ravelry store. She grabbed the pattern when it was on sale so she chose the $5 coupon! Congratulations, hope you find something great!

The next draw will take place September 7, 2020. I will do it at 5pm Saskatchewan time (CST / GMT -6). The prize will be the same as last week (the Abstract Queen pattern – listed at $6 CAD, or a $5 CAD coupon).

I am hoping to get some more interesting prizes for the later weeks. I want you all to have fun with this project and finish it so you can show off your hard work!

P.S. if you want to grab your own copy of the Abstract Queen you can get it on Ravelry or Etsy. Both places include both versions of the pattern (Interlocking / LFM and Mosaic) and a chart.

Brackets in Crochet Patterns

There are so many skills to learn when attempting to crochet something! First we have to learn how to do the stitches, we also have to learn how to choose a hook size and what yarn to use or substitute, some are just learning how to read patterns or how to read those fancy pictures or a chart, and then you finally get all that figured out and you come across a pattern that says:

JS, sc1, [{(dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2} x2, (dc1, sc5) x3, (dc1, sc1) x3, (dc1, sc5) x3, dc1, sc1] x4, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2, ES

Cue the scary music!

What are you supposed to do with all that!!?!

Brackets are a very useful tool when writing patterns, but they can definitely be confusing. I can only tell you how my patterns use the brackets – other designers may have different methods!

The example line above comes from the mosaic version of my Abstract Queen CAL and I will break it down for you here but the same concept applies to all my patterns.

I use three types of brackets: ( ) { } [ ] and I always use them in the same order [ { ( ) } ]. You repeat the instructions in the bracket x whatever number is listed.

Our example again: JS, sc1, [{(dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2} x2, (dc1, sc5) x3, (dc1, sc1) x3, (dc1, sc5) x3, dc1, sc1] x4, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2, ES

In the example above it starts with JS, sc1, and then you get 3 brackets in a row!

[{(

It begins with a square bracket, so, if you follow along to find the ending square bracket you can see what needs to be repeated.

[{(dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2} x2, (dc1, sc5) x3, (dc1, sc1) x3, (dc1, sc5) x3, dc1, sc1] x4,

We could expand it and write it all out, it would look like this:

{(dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2} x2, (dc1, sc5) x3, (dc1, sc1) x3, (dc1, sc5) x3, dc1, sc1, {(dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2} x2, (dc1, sc5) x3, (dc1, sc1) x3, (dc1, sc5) x3, dc1, sc1, {(dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2} x2, (dc1, sc5) x3, (dc1, sc1) x3, (dc1, sc5) x3, dc1, sc1, {(dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2} x2, (dc1, sc5) x3, (dc1, sc1) x3, (dc1, sc5) x3, dc1, sc1

We still have a lot of brackets in there, let’s expand that first bracket again.

{(dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2} x2 turns into: (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2

And breaking it down one step further, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2 turns into dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3

So, without brackets our instructions looks like this: JS, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc1, ES

The Abstract Queen was a 90 page pattern without brackets. With brackets, it is down to 23 pages.

Now that we understand what the brackets tell us, how can we use them while crocheting?

I would follow the pattern and essentially I ignore the first bracket when I see it. When I see the end bracket I look at how many times to repeat it and back up a few steps to that bracket’s beginning.

Our example again: JS, sc1, [{(dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2} x2, (dc1, sc5) x3, (dc1, sc1) x3, (dc1, sc5) x3, dc1, sc1] x4, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2, ES

I would crochet my joining stitch, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3 and then I see it says close bracket, ) x2. So, I look back a few steps to the opening bracket ( and crochet dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3 again.

Then I move on and do dc1, sc1 and I see the closed bracket ) x2, again so I back up and do dc1, sc1 again.

A different style of closed bracket then appears } x2, so I go back and find where it opens and repeat everything inside. In this case that means I do dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3 and then repeat dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3. Then, I dc1, sc1, and repeat dc1, sc1.

Then I continue outside that { } bracket and do dc1, sc5. It tells me to do that 3 times, so I dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5 again.

The next bit says dc1, sc1, do it 3 times, so I repeat dc1, sc1, and again, dc1, sc1.

I then come to dc1, sc5 and it says 3 times again, so I do another dc1, sc5 and dc1, sc5.

I do the next dc1, sc1 and see a square bracket ] x4. So I have to rewind and find the opening of the square. It is way at the beginning and I have to count 4 repeats of it, so I make a note somewhere. You can write on your pattern or make a note on your tablet or however you like to keep track. I use stitch markers to keep track of the repeats if it is something that is confusing me (honestly, it depends on the day, some days my brain can handle more information lol).

For this pattern I would probably put a stitch marker in now and start at the beginning of the square bracket again. If you wanted to color coordinate you could use pink for square brackets and yellow for wiggly brackets (they probably have an official name, I don’t know what it is) and green for regular brackets. Some of my pattern testers use color-coded highlighters on their pattern to keep track.

There’s no right way, you have to find a method that works for you. And, this isn’t the easiest pattern to do, so be patient with yourself and count, count, count! You don’t want to have to frog (rip it, rip it = rip it out) your work.

I hope this helps! These skills that use our brain power are helping us avoid dementia and alzheimer’s! So, keep at it!

Creating a Ravelry Project

I always have multiple projects on the go. I tried counting my WIPs (works-in-progress) but it gets overwhelming. I have heard of people keeping a journal log, and I really like that idea except it is one more thing floating around for the kids to lose or the toddler to draw on.

That is why saving my projects online really catches my attention!

Ravelry has a lot of great features (and some things are not so great, but that’s true about pretty much everything in life). One thing you can do is create a project, which is linked to a pattern, and then everyone who wants to try that project can see what you’ve done! It’s a great way to get color inspiration and it is a fun way to see everyone’s progress in a Crochet-A-Long (CAL).

For my Abstract Queen CAL I am going to have a weekly prize to keep you all motivated to get this massive blanket finished!

Week 1 starts on September 1. If you have already purchased the pattern you can get started right away, but even if you haven’t purchased the pattern you CAN create a project page on Ravelry showing us the pile of yarn you are going to use!

On August 31, right before the CAL starts, I will randomly select one of the linked projects to win your choice of a $5 gift certificate to my pattern store OR the Abstract Queen pattern (which, on September 1, goes back to the regular price of $6 CAD).

You can name your project anything you want; I usually leave it as suggested because I’m lazy. Lately, I have been adding “Mosaic” or “LFM” to the title because it helps me see at a glance which projects I’ve done in which technique.

To be entered into the first draw make sure you add at least one relevant picture. If you do have the pattern already, make sure you don’t show it in the pictures (that goes for any copyrighted pattern, not just this project).

You can see in the screenshot above I have shared it with my Ravelry group – we would love it if you joined us there too!

Doctor Who: Tardis 20

This is a small square and won’t take you too long to make. The “20” refers to how many windows you begin the pattern with when making it using the interlocking crochet technique. You can follow along with my YouTube videos if you want to use the interlocking technique.

The chart can be used for both interlocking and mosaic crochet (and probably other crafts too). The written instructions for both are below, click on the word in the previous sentence to be taken to that part of this blog entry.

The Locked Filet Mesh (LFM) interlocking crochet method uses only chain spaces and double crochets to create a mesh; two colors are worked alternately which creates the pattern.

Mosaic crochet is single crochet and double crochet stitches. The double crochet stitches cover some of the other color’s single crochet stitches to create the design. My patterns instruct you to cut your yarn at the end of each row.

See my other posts for tutorials on both techniques.

Interlocking Crochet Pattern (Locked Filet Mesh / LFM)

Important Details

  • US crochet terminology
  • Chart is 41 x 41
  • Finished square (with border) measures approximately 10”
  • 4.5 mm hook (US7)
  • Worsted weight yarn (131 yards total)
    • Main color (MC) – 60 yards plus 11 for optional border (blue on chart)
    • Accent color (AC) – 60 yards (grey on chart)
  • Gauge: 4 DC x 2 rows = 1”
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Key

RS = right side: the side of your work that will show the finished design
WS = wrong side: the back of your project
Front = the side currently facing you
Back = the side not facing you
Ch = chain
Sp = space
Sk = skip a stitch
SC = single crochet
DC = double crochet
F = DC in front, then CH 1
B = DC behind, then CH 1
ES = DC into the last window space
EF = end stitch in front: using AC, DC into the last AC window, working in front of MC
EB = end stitch in back: using AC, DC into the last AC window, working behind MC
ACF = bring the AC yarn to the side facing you
ACB = put AC yarn to the side facing away from you

Notes:

  • If you chain tighter than me you may need to Ch 4 where I Ch 3
  • Don’t confuse RS / WS with Front / Back
  • Remember, each color is worked into itself only and there is a chain space between each DC

Foundation Rows (21 MC stitches / 20 AC stitches)

  1. Using MC create 20 windows. I prefer the chainless technique using triple/treble crochet but alternatively you can Ch 41 + 3 (or 4 if you chain tighter than me), then DC in 6th (or 7th) Ch from your hook. *Ch 1, Sk 1, DC* repeat until the end. Place stitch marker so your work doesn’t unravel.
  2. With your AC, Ch 41 +1 (or 2 if you chain tighter). Place MC windows on top of this chain (make sure the end with the stitch marker is at your left) and pull the tail of your AC through the window on the right end (see picture by the Key). DC through the back of the next window into the 6th (or 7th) Ch from your hook.
  3. *Ch 1, Sk 1, DC through back* repeat to end. Place stitch marker so your work doesn’t unravel. Both stitch markers should be on the same end.

WS – ACB (wrong side facing you, AC to back)

4 MC – Ch3, 1B, 1F, 1B, 10F, 1B, 1F, 2B, 1F, 1B, ES

5 AC – Ch3 in back, 3B, 9F, 6B, EB

RS – ACF (right side facing you, AC to front)

6 MC – Ch3, 2F, 1B, 2F, 1B, 1F, 8B, 4F, ES

7 AC – Ch3 in front, 6F, 9B, 3F, EF

WS – ACB

8 MC – Ch3, 1B, 3F, 1B, 6F, 1B, 1F, 1B, 4F, 1B, ES

9 AC – Ch3 in back, 5B, 2F, 1B, 2F, 3B, 4F, 1B, EB

RS – ACF

10 MC – Ch3, 1F, 4B, 1F, 1B, 2F, 1B, 2F, 1B, 4F, 1B, 1F, ES

11 AC – Ch3 in front, 18F, EF

WS – ACB

12 MC – Ch3, 2B, 1F, 3B, 1F, 2B, 1F, 3B, 5F, 1B, ES

13 AC – Ch3 in back, 5B, 2F, 1B, 2F, 3B, 4F, 1B, EB

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RS – ACF

14 MC – Ch3, 1F, 2B, 1F, 1B, 3F, 6B, 1F, 2B, 2F, ES

15 AC – Ch3 in front, 8F, 2B, 1F, 2B, 5F, EF

WS – ACB

16 MC – Ch3, 1B, 2F, 3B, 1F, 2B, 1F, 2B, 1F, 1B, 1F, 1B, 2F, 1B, ES

17 AC – Ch3 in back, 13B, 4F, 1B, EB

RS – ACF

18 MC – Ch3, 1F, 6B, 2F, 1B, 2F, 1B, 3F, 2B, 1F, ES

19 AC – Ch3 in front, 1F, 4B, 3F, 2B, 1F, 2B, 5F, EF

WS – ACB

20 MC – Ch3, 3B, 1F, 1B, 6F, 1B, 1F, 1B, 1F, 1B, 2F, 1B, ES

21 AC – Ch3 in back, 5B, 2F, 1B, 2F, 5B, 1F, 2B, EB

RS – ACF

22 MC – Ch3, 1F, 1B, 2F, 1B, 4F, 1B, 2F, 1B, 4F, 1B, 1F, ES

23 AC – Ch3 in front, 1F, 1B, 1F, 2B, 6F, 2B, 5F, EF

WS – ACB

24 MC – Ch3, 2B, 1F, 3B, 1F, 2B, 1F, 3B, 5F, 1B, ES

25 AC – Ch3 in back, 5B, 2F, 1B, 2F, 5B, 2F, 1B, EB

RS – ACF

26 MC – Ch3, 2F, 1B, 3F, 1B, 1F, 6B, 1F, 1B, 3F, ES

27 AC – Ch3 in front, 8F, 2B, 1F, 2B, 5F, EF

WS – ACB

28 MC – Ch3, 1B, 2F, 10B, 2F, 1B, 1F, 2B, ES

29 AC – Ch3 in back, 5B, 2F, 1B, 2F, 3B, 4F, 1B, EB

RS – ACF

30 MC – Ch3, 1F, 6B, 9F, 2B, 1F, ES

31 AC – Ch3 in front, 1F, 4B, 3F, 2B, 1F, 2B, 5F, EF

WS – ACB

32 MC – Ch3, 2B, 2F, 1B, 6F, 1B, 6F, 1B, ES

33 AC – Ch3 in back, 3B, 9F, 1B, 2F, 1B, 1F, 1B, EB

RS – ACF

34 MC – Ch3, 2F, 1B, 1F, 1B, 2F, 8B, 2F, 1B, 1F, ES

35 AC – Ch3 in front, 6F, 9B, 3F, EF

WS – ACB

36 MC – Ch3, 1B, 3F, 1B, 6F, 1B, 1F, 1B, 1F, 1B, 1F, 2B, ES

37 AC – Ch3 in back, 4B, 7F, 2B, 1F, 1B, 2F, 1B, EB

RS – ACB*

38 MC – Ch3, 1F, 5B, 1F, 3B, 2F, 3B, 1F, 1B, 2F, ES

39 AC – Ch3 in back, 18B, EB

WS

40 MC – Ch3, 19F, ES

Cut and tie off, OR continue with border.

SC Border

Ch1, put 2 SC in each gap on all four sides. Add an extra ch2 space in each corner (corner gap will have 2sc, 2ch, 2sc).

FINISHED!

Take a picture and share it! @Ashleeslint #lockedfiletmeshcrochet


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Mosaic Crochet

Important Details

  • US crochet terminology
  • Chart is 41 x 41 = 1,681 stitches
  • Finished size approximately 10” x 10”
  • 4.5 mm hook (US7)
  • Worsted weight yarn (140 yards)
    • Main color – 70 yards
    • Contrasting color – 70 yards
  • Gauge: 16 stitches x 16 rows = 4”

Key

MC = Main Color: blue in chart
CC = Contrasting Color: grey in chart
Sp = space
Sk = skip a stitch
CH = chain
SC = single crochet
sc = SC into Back Loop only
DC = double crochet
dc = DC into Front Loop of stitch, 2 rows below
JS = Joining Stitch: insert hook under both loops, pull up a loop, slip stitch, SC in same space
ES = End Stitch: SC under both loops, CH 1, cut yarn and pull through tightly

Notes:

  • Remember to skip the same number of stitch(es) behind your dc(s) before doing your next sc
  • The front of your work is always facing you (this is the right side, the side showing the design)
  • You are always working from the right to the left
  • You tie on a new yarn at the beginning of each row and cut it at the end
    • Tails don’t need to be longer than an inch and a half
  • Yarn colors can be anything you like
    • They need to contrast well (try a black and white photo to see if they are too similar)
    • They need to be the same weight (size/thickness)
    • My charts use black as the Main Color and white as the Coordinating Color
  • I prefer using a chainless SC to create my foundation row because then I have tails on both sides of my work just like all the other rows will have
  • Even-numbered rows use MC; odd-numbered rows use CC

Foundation Row: use Main Color (MC) (blue on the chart)

Use a chainless SC technique to create 41 +2 SC. Or, chain 41 +3, SC in 2nd from hook and all the way back across. Cut and tie off.

Switch to Contrasting Color (CC) {Even- rows use MC; odd-numbered rows use CC}

1 – JS, sc41, ES

2 – JS, dc1, sc39, dc1, ES

3 – JS, sc41, ES

4 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc21, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

5 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x6, dc1, sc19, (dc1, sc1) x4, ES

6 – JS, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc17, (dc1, sc1) x4, dc1, ES

7 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x6, dc1, sc19, (dc1, sc1) x4, ES

8 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc9, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

9 – JS, (sc1, dc1) x2, sc9, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x6, ES

10 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc9, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x3, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

11 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x20, ES

12 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc11, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, ES

13 – JS, (sc1, dc1) x2, sc9, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x6, ES

14 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, ES

15 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x8, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x6, ES

16 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

17 – JS, (sc1, dc1) x2, sc9, (dc1, sc1) x14, ES

18 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

19 – JS, (sc1, dc1) x2, sc9, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x6, ES

20 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x3, dc1, ES

21 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x4, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x6, ES

22 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x3, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x3, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

23 – JS, (sc1, dc1) x2, sc3, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x5, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x6, ES

24 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc11, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, ES

25 – JS, (sc1, dc1) x2, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x4, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x6, ES

26 – JS, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x3, dc1, ES

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27 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x8, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x6, ES

28 – JS, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x9, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

29 – JS, (sc1, dc1) x2, sc9, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x6, ES

30 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc13, (dc1, sc1) x8, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

31 – JS, (sc1, dc1) x2, sc9, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x6, ES

32 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, ES

33 – JS, (sc1, dc1) x2, sc3, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc19, (dc1, sc1) x4, ES

34 – JS, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc17, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

35 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x6, dc1, sc19, (dc1, sc1) x4, ES

36 – JS, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

37 – JS, (sc1, dc1) x2, sc5, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc15, (dc1, sc1) x5, ES

38 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc11, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, ES

39 – JS, sc41, ES

40 – JS, dc1, sc39, dc1, ES

Tie your ends together.

Trim the fringe.

Add a border if you want.

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