Many Hearts Baby Throw Blanket

Before I jump into the details on my newest pattern (which is really a remake of an old pattern), let me tell you that I am having a FALL SALE on everything in my Ravelry Store and Etsy Shop until the end of September! Get 25% off, no Codes needed!

Many moons ago (that’s a funny saying, isn’t it?) I came out with an eBook called “Hearts, Hearts, Hearts” and I put an assortment of squares of different sizes and designs in it. The largest pattern in the eBook was my “Many Hearts Throw“.

Anonymous crocheted this sweet blue and white version of the large throw blanket.

By request, I have now created a baby-blanket-size version of this throw. The original throw is 70″ square and the new baby blanket is 38″ square. You can see that the corners are the same but the repeated hearts section inside is smaller.

I used the interlocking crochet technique for my sample because I like the way the back looks (mosaic crochet produces stripes on the wrong side but interlocking crochet shows these hearts pointing the other direction). This lavender purple is being used as my main color (MC) in the pattern. Most of my patterns use the darker color as the first color used, or the Main Color in the pattern.

I also made a super fun little video clip because Etsy tells me people like to see videos and Instagram’s algorithms are really pushing for us to use videos instead of photos, so here’s my attempt at fitting in. It was actually an accident that I started recording a video. I meant to press the button to capture a photo and somehow I bumped the thing that changed it to a video instead and that’s when I remembered that I need to try using videos anyway. This is not the kind of video I consider to be award-winning. It’s just to meet algorithm madness and try to get better organic reach. I don’t pay for ads or subscribers, I prefer to keep my followers as a list of people who actually want to see my stuff.

Video of a blanket hanging on a fence near a tree

I spent a lot of time debating internally whether this pattern deserved its own Ravelry listing or if it should just be added to the Many Hearts Throw as a size difference. I ultimately decided that since the various sizes of “Many Hearts” all have their own listings then this blanket can have its own as well.

I have turned on a permanent promotion that allows you to get this baby blanket free if you’ve purchased the larger throw blanket on Ravelry. And, of course, I have added it as a late addition to the “Hearts, Hearts, Hearts” eBook so if you already have that eBook then you will now have this new baby blanket as well. I didn’t have all of these patterns listed on Etsy previously so that’s a new thing here too.

This eBook has also *finally* been updated to include the x-marked charts for mosaic crochet. There are 15 patterns in this set and while I’ve been busy updating all my patterns I did leave the “hard” tasks for last. The eBooks just feel like so much more work than the individual patterns. I still need to update the Alphabet eBooks and the Holiday eBook.

I hope to create a YouTube tutorial on using these charts marked with X’s, but for now I only have written instructions.

Also, a side note: the smallest square, “Tutorial Hearts“, is the one I used in my videos to teach the interlocking crochet method (Locked Filet Mesh / LFM) and overlay mosaic crochet method.

I also made this neat photo signature business card thing. At one point I had planned on going to graphic design school and I love how I get to build some of those skills while I turn my crochet hobby into a business! So many avenues to explore!

Summer Direction CAL for Interlocking Crochet

This is my 5th Crochet-A-Long (CAL) since I started designing about a year ago. My first CAL was some large flower squares for Mother’s Day 2020. Then I did a Father’s Day CAL of scarves that joined together to create a blanket. My third CAL was the Abstract Queen; it was the first one to be available with written instructions for both interlocking and overlay mosaic crochet (before that, the other CALs were just interlocking crochet, but they have been updated since then to include both techniques). A few months ago we did the MusicCAL (which had an easier and smaller repeat section compared to the Abstract Queen CAL). I also contributed to the Friends Around the World 6th Anniversary CAL, but since I didn’t host that one I don’t consider it one of “MY” Crochet-A-Longs.

You can find the links for all my Crochet-A-Longs (CALs) in one place here: https://ashleeslint.com/cals/

My newest CAL, the Summer Direction CAL, like all of my patterns now, is written up for two different techniques: interlocking crochet and overlay mosaic crochet. This CAL has video walk-thrus for both techniques! That’s the big new thing about this pattern.

This is the landing page for the INTERLOCKING CROCHET method of my Summer Direction CAL. It is also available on the overlay mosaic landing page. I did pre-release the yardage charts, but you can also view them here on this post.

If you’re new to interlocking crochet, you may want to check out my tutorials first! I call this technique Locked Filet Mesh as well – they mean the same thing. You’ll find other designers call it all sorts of things (Interdimensional Crochet, Wacky Weave Crochet, etc).

I created a video walk-thru for each section in this Summer Direction CAL! It was a bigger job than I expected and it put me behind schedule so I almost didn’t get this ready before the end of summer! And, you may find that as you learn the technique you prefer to just read the written instructions and don’t even need my videos – that’s ok!

The written instructions can be found FREE here online (one section released at a time) or you can purchase a nice PDF of the entire pattern (including a plain chart for interlocking and a chart marked with X’s for mosaic as well as links to each YouTube walk-thru for every section) on Etsy or Ravelry.

Get 50% off when you use code, “SUMMER2021” (offer ends 11:59 pm, CST, September 30, 2021, valid on Etsy and Ravelry for the pattern “Summer Direction CAL” only).

My single-width samples for the YouTube videos!

Remember to subscribe to my YouTube channel to get notified when the videos are live! You can also subscribe to my mailing list and / or subscribe directly to the blog (there should be a spot to enter your email in the side bar).


Summer Direction CAL – Interlocking Crochet

Section 1 – Foundation Rows

The first section is very short. It is aptly called, “Foundation Rows” and we will decide how wide our project is going to be and how much yarn we will need. The YouTube video does not include information on yardage so please see the written portion for that!

Section 2 – Chevron A (WS)

It is important when doing a project in interlocking crochet that you pay attention to the wrong side and right side. This section continues from where we left off, and thus we are first looking at the wrong side (WS).

Section 3 – Chevron A (RS)

Like mentioned earlier, it is important when doing a project in interlocking crochet that you pay attention to the wrong side and right side. This section begins when looking at the right side (RS).

Section 4 – Dark Arrows

This section begins when looking at the Wrong Side (WS) but since my design does not use it again I HAVE NOT created a duplicate section beginning with the Right Side (RS). There is a section later on that looks almost the same – however it is actually a reversed or mirrored image.

Section 5 – Chevron A (WS)

If you’ve been following the pattern as written, we are now at row 49. However, this section is identical to rows 5-14. Both the video and the written pattern will begin with row 5 and go through row 14. You may wish to use a stitch marker to mark row 49 so that you remember it counts as the beginning of this section.

Section 6 – Chevron B (RS)

This chevron differs from Chevron “A” because it goes up and then down instead of down and then up. This section begins with us looking at the Right Side (RS).

Section 7 – Light Arrows

These arrows are hollow, just the outline is drawn. This is our halfway point!

Section 8 – Chevron A (RS)

This section is identical to an earlier section so the written portion and the YouTube video shows rows 15-24 while we are actually crocheting rows 95-104.

Section 9 – Chevron B (WS)

This is the first time we have crocheted the “B” chevron starting with the Wrong Side (WS) facing us so there is a NEW YouTube video for you to watch!

Section 10 – Dark Arrows Reversed

These look very similar to those dark arrows at the beginning of our project but their direction is actually reversed. Or perhaps a mirror-image is a better way to think of it. Either way, there’s a NEW YouTube video to accompany this section.

Section 11 – Chevron B (WS)

You might be a pro at this interlocking crochet stuff by now! If you still need to reference the video please rewatch the section that covers rows 105-116. The written portion also says rows 105-116 but if you’ve been diligently following the pattern your project will be at row 141-150.

Section 12 – Chevron B (RS)

We’ve done this chevron before, so you know what to do: follow the YouTube video for rows 59-70 or follow with the written pattern (remember, we are at rows 151-160 even though the section you are following will say rows 59-70).

Section 13 – Top Border Lines

This is barely a “section”. We are just finishing off the pattern.

This space will be updated with each new section release (with a link to the written section online and the YouTube tutorial for that section).

We are finished! No more updates!


Interlocking Crochet Pattern

I know you’ve been eager to get started, so let’s figure out some details!

Remember, the written instructions can be found FREE here online or you can purchase a nice PDF of the entire pattern (including the chart and working links to each YouTube tutorial) on Etsy or Ravelry. Get 50% off when you use code, “SUMMER2021” (offer ends 11:59 pm, CST, September 30, 2021).

To create a full-sized blanket, do 9 repeats for the width. You repeat the stitches between the stars as many times as you want. Each repeat will add about 4.5” in width. Each line has instructions between stars, like this: Ch3 in back, 1F, *2F, 1B, 1F, 1B, 4F*, EB     

If you are doing 2 repeats you will crochet: Ch3 in back, 1F, 2F, 1B, 1F, 1B, 4F, 2F, 1B, 1F, 1B, 4F, EB

If you repeat 3 times: Ch3 in back, 1F, 2F, 1B, 1F, 1B, 4F, 2F, 1B, 1F, 1B, 4F, 2F, 1B, 1F, 1B, 4F, EB

When repeating the pattern 9 times your foundation rows will have 84 MC windows or chain 172, skip the turning chain and single crochet 171 back. Foundation row step 2, using AC: chain 170, then continue as described.

Take note that when using the interlocking crochet technique your stitches do not always create an opposite image on the reverse side. Due to starting on the right side or the wrong side you have different instructions to create the same image.

Yarn weight and hook size can easily be adjusted, just keep in mind your finished project will use a different amount of yarn and be a different finished size. A gauge swatch can help with that.

To figure out how many stitches you begin with:

I’ve done an example for 3 and 9 repeats wide but you can choose any number of repeats!

LFM FoundationScarf (single width)(3 repeats)Blanket (9 repeats)
Finished Size (41” height includes all the sections of the original designs)6.5” x 41”14” x 41”42” x 41”
MC Windows to start (repeats x 9) + 3 = windows  9 + 3 = 12 windows(3 x 9) + 3 = 30 windows(9 x 9) + 3 = 84 windows
Or MC Chains to start (windows x 2) + 4 = MC Chains  (12 x 2) + 4 = 26 chains(30 x 2) + 4 = 64 chains(84 x 2) + 4 = 172 chains
AC Chains to start (repeats x 18) + 8 = AC Chains18 + 8 = 26 chains(3 x 18) + 8 = 62 chains(9 x 18) + 8 = 170 chains

Yardage Estimates (worsted weight, gauge 16 DC x 8 rows of one color = 4”)

LFM YardageScarf (single width)(3 repeats)Blanket (9 repeats)
Yardage per color = base + repeats40 + (105) = 14540 + (105 x 3) = 35540 + (105 x 9) = 985
Optional SC Border = base + repeats20 + (3) = 2320 + (3 x 3) = 2920 + (3 x 9) = 47
Total Yards = first row x 2 (for MC and AC), plus optional border145 x 2 = 290 + 23 = 313355 x 2 = 710 + 29 = 739985 x 2 = 1970 + 47 = 2017

Important Details

  • US Crochet Terminology
  • Full blanket chart 169 x 165
  • Repeat chart is 18 squares wide (plus 7 squares for border lines) x 165 tall
  • Full blanket measurements approximately 42” x 41”
  • 4.5 mm hook (US7)
  • Worsted weight yarn (1970 – 2020 yards total for a blanket)
    • Main color (MC) – 985 yards plus 50 for optional border
    • Accent color (AC) – 985 yards
  • Gauge: 16 DC x 8 rows (of one color) = 4”

KEY

AC = accent color (usually light or multicolored)

MC = main color (usually dark)

RS = right side: the side of your work that will show the finished design

WS = wrong side: the back of your project

Back = the side not facing you

Front = the side currently facing you

ch = chain

sk = skip a stitch

sc = single crochet: insert hook, yarn over, pull up loop, yarn over, pull through both loops

dc = double crochet: yarn over, insert hook, yarn over, pull up loop, *yarn over, pull through two loops* twice

tr = treble crochet: yarn over twice, insert hook, yarn over, pull up loop, *yarn over, pull through two loops* three times

B = double crochet (dc) behind, and chain 1

F = double crochet (dc) in front, and chain 1

EB = end stitch in back: using AC, dc into the last AC window, working behind MC

EF = end stitch in front: using AC, dc into the last AC window, working in front of MC

ES = end stitch: dc into the last window space

ACB = put AC yarn to the side facing away from you

ACF = bring the AC yarn to the side facing you

Foundation Rows (see chart above for help with counting)

  1. Using MC create repeats of 9 + 3 windows:
    1. I prefer the chainless technique (chain 6, dc into first stitch, chain 1, tr into same space, *chain 1, tr into 2nd part of the previous tr* repeat as many times as needed).
    1. Alternatively, you can Ch repeats of 18 + 10 (or 11 if you chain tighter than me), then DC in 6th (or 7th) chain from your hook. *Ch 1, Sk 1, DC* repeat until the end. Place stitch marker so your work doesn’t unravel.
  2. With your AC, Ch repeats of 18 + 8 (or 9 if you chain tighter). Lay MC windows below this chain (make sure the end with the stitch marker is at your left) then pull the tail of your AC through the window on the right end (see picture above). DC through the back of the next window into the 6th (or 7th) chain from your hook.
  3. *Ch 1, Sk 1, DC through the back* repeat to end. Place stitch marker so your work doesn’t unravel. Both stitch markers should be on the same end.
The chain tail goes through the first window of the trellis.

WS – ACB (wrong side facing you, AC to back)  

4 MC – Ch3, 1B, *9F*, 1B, ES

Thus concludes our foundation rows! This is the tricky and sometimes frustrating part of all my projects. The foundation rows are boring, involve a lot of long counting, can get a bit twisted, and don’t look very exciting when you’re done. But this is a very important part of our project so it must be done!

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© 2021 Ashlee Brotzell.
All rights reserved. This publication is protected under federal copyright laws. Reproduction or distribution, in whole or in part, in any medium, is strictly prohibited.

What does this mean?
This is an original pattern by Ashlee Brotzell. You may not copy, reproduce, sell, or share any part of it whether for profit or not. This includes, but is not limited to, the written pattern, the chart, and the photos. No translations or video tutorials are allowed.

Sales of your finished items are, of course, unrestricted (and I wish you all the best!). I appreciate credit given to the designer when possible but it is not a requirement. You may tag me @AshleesLint or direct people to my website http://www.ashleeslint.com

Baby Sea Turtle: the 4th pattern but there will be more!

My four-year-old son LOVES sea turtles. He really like all ocean-things but there’s something special about a baby sea turtle.

For months, every time we took the (chicken) egg carton out of the fridge he would want to come play with the baby sea turtles (tv shows always show baby sea turtles hatching from their eggs). It was a bit hard to bake with him during that phase. Usually we like to make cookies and cake but it was hard for me to keep the eggs safe from his quick, but not-so-nimble hands.

This little blanket will be for him. I used my preferred technique, interlocking crochet (also called Locked Filet Mesh or LFM) because I can crochet it much quicker than when I do mosaic crochet. This blanket took me a week – I am sure some of you will be much quicker and many of you will take much longer for a blanket of this size. That’s ok!

I used a discontinued yarn for my sample. It was on clearance and I love a good bargain. The fluffy yarn I used (Premiere Pixie Dust) is considered a worsted weight yarn but the labels suggests you use a 5.5 mm hook. I really like the stitches to be quite small with interlocking crochet because it keeps those chain-gap-squares small and then the other color doesn’t show through too much, so I used a 5 mm hook.

Because it is so fluffy it does make the details of the design a bit less defined. And even though I used a 5 mm hook instead of my favorite 4.5 mm hook, I still used less than 500 yards per color. My finished square, including the simple single crochet border, is 33″ square.

You can use any weight yarn for my blankets, just make sure you use an appropriately-sized hook.

I titled this pattern “Baby Sea Turtle”, singular, but then I drew it with 3 little turtles swimming in the sea. 😬🤷‍♀️ I did the same with the dolphin pattern. The title is singular but the image shows more than one animal. One of my weird quirks, I guess.

My interlocking crochet version of “Baby Sea Turtle”

And, as always, the pattern is written up for interlocking crochet and overlay mosaic crochet. The two files each include written instructions and an appropriate chart.

The chart that is attached to the mosaic instructions has X’s where you need to do your dropped double crochets. I hope to make my own tutorial video for using the chart with X’s soon. But for now it is mostly useful for people who are already familiar with that style.

Natalie Caruso has been amazingly helpful in creating these charts with X’s for you guys. Thank you, Natalie!

If you’ve seen the previous patterns in this series, then you already know I created an eBook on Ravelry called “Baby Ocean & Others“. All of the patterns in this eBook have a chart size of 121 x 121 and have an ocean theme.

These blankets – when matching the gauge stated in the pattern – will be about 30″ square. My sample with the fluffy yarn and large hook came out to about 33″ square.

All of the patterns in my Baby Blankets section on Etsy and Ravelry are the same size.

You can get “Baby Sea Turtle” on Etsy or Ravelry. Use code, “BABY21” to get 20% off* all my baby blanket patterns!

*20% discount is valid in my Etsy Shop on Preemie Love Blanket, Feline the Deer, Many Hugs, Baby Ocean, Baby Dolphin, Baby Crab, Baby Sea Turtle, Baby Whale, Baby Fish, and Baby Ocean & Others eBook; use code “BABY21MORE”.

And in my Ravely store on Preemie Love Blanket, Feline the Deer, Many Hugs, Baby Ocean, Baby Dolphin, Baby Crab, Baby Sea Turtle, Baby Whale, Baby Fish, and Baby Ocean & Others eBook. Code “BABY21” must be used at the time of purchase, and is not retroactive. Offer ends 11:59 pm CST July 31, 2021. OFFER EXTENDED TO AUGUST 10, 2021.

And, sorry for the delay in adding Baby Crab to the list of sale patterns – I forgot it doesn’t happen automatically!

The wrong side, using interlocking crochet. If you use the mosaic technique it will be striped on the back instead.

FATW6: Mosaic Coral Strip

Introduction

This is a pattern for an overlay mosaic crochet strip that belongs in the Friends Around the World 6th Anniversary CAL (FATW6) “Adventures in Mosaic Crochet” hosted by CAL – Crochet A Long. Links to all past and future patterns can be found on their blog: https://calcrochetalong.com and you can join their facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/668646249929007/

My section (this Mosaic Coral Strip) can be found here on the blog (scroll down) or downloaded on Ravelry: https://ravel.me/mosaic-coral-strip

You can also crochet with my YouTube video to guide you! Please note: the video does not show the foundation rows. You can add sections onto each other, but if this is your first section you must start with a foundation row; see my other YouTube tutorial on creating a Mosaic Foundation: https://youtu.be/RqgmJQMaB7A for more information.

When I first designed this piece I didn’t know I would be the first section in the blanket. That’s why my Coral video mentions that you will be joining to a project you already have. But I have created a video on crocheting the foundation rows now!

Quick Bio

I published my first pattern less than a year ago (April 1, 2020) and, honestly, that was a dream come true! My grandmother taught me to crochet when I was about 8 years old, and it has been a favorite hobby of mine in an on-again-off-again kind of way. I finished my first blanket in high school and created a few projects over the years to fit my needs (how about a bag that fits this book exactly and nothing else).

Three years ago, I picked up my hooks in earnest again as a coping method after the traumatic delivery of my son. Crocheting – and now, pattern designing, too – are therapy for me. I am so grateful to everyone who has supported me and made it a little easier to stay at home with my 3 beautiful children.

I was also able to achieve another dream of mine in April 2021: I got published in a magazine! My Eiffel Tower Wall Hanging can be found in Crochet Now! Magazine, issue 68. I feel a little famous now!

The Coral Strip

I love how wiggly and intricate coral can look. It is almost abstract enough that if you didn’t know it was called “Coral” you might just think it was random lines.

My single repeat used 30 g of yarn (Medium 4 – worsted weight, acrylic). I used Caron Kindness in Tomato and Robin’s Egg Blue because it was what I had on hand. Unfortunately, this is a discontinued yarn. You can use any yarn medium (4) weight yarn. If you’d like some suggestions, try Yarnsub.com for a list of similar yarns.

Like the other patterns in this CAL, each repeat is 48 stitches wide. An extra stitch is added at the beginning of each row, and two extra stitches are added to the end. Each designer may have different ways of explaining things but all the pieces in this CAL are designed to work together!

My chart does not show those extra 3 stitches (the joining stitch, balancing stitch, and end stitch), it only shows the repeated section.

Chart is included in the ravelry download

If you share your works on Instagram, I would love for you to tag me: @AshleesLint

YouTube

I created a YouTube video to go with this pattern! You can see each stitch being done and crochet with me! Please note: the Coral video does not show the foundation rows. You can add sections onto each other, but if this is your first section you must start with a foundation row.

Foundation Row YouTube Video

Don’t forget to like and subscribe to my YouTube channel!

Mosaic Coral Strip YouTube Video

Important Details

  • US crochet terminology
  • Chart is 48 x 19, add 1 extra stitch at the beginning of each row and 2 extra stitches at the end of each row. Repeat is 48 + 3 stitches wide.
  • 5 mm hook (H-8)
  • 18 g / 21 yards of Main Color (MC) = coral
  • 12 g / 30 yards of Contrasting Color (CC) = light blue
  • One repeat finishes at 10” x 4” / 26 x 10 cm
  • Gauge: 18 stitches x 18 rows = 4” / 10 cm

Key (US terminology)

MC = Main Color: coral in chart

CC = Contrasting Color: light blue in chart

ch = chain

SC = single crochet: insert hook, pull up a loop, yarn over, pull through both loops on hook

sc = SC into Back Loop only

DC = double crochet: yarn over, insert hook, pull up a loop, *yarn over, pull through two loops* twice

dc = dropped double crochet: skip next single crochet, and instead double crochet into Front Loop of stitch in the row below

JS = Joining Stitch: create slip knot, insert hook under both loops, complete a normal single crochet

ES = End Stitch: single crochet under both loops, chain 1, cut yarn and pull through tightly

Mosaic Technique

Please see the YouTube tutorial for more details. I use a single-row mosaic technique. Each square on the chart corresponds to one stitch. There is an additional stitch (not visible on the chart) on each side of the chart for joining and ending (for this pattern only, add an extra balancing stitch at the end of each row before doing the “ES = end stitch”). You start at the bottom-right corner of the chart.

dc = the dropped DC goes into the same-colored stitch, 2 rows below, front loop only. Skip the (pink) single crochet behind this dc.
sc = a single crochet in the body of this pattern goes into the back loop only
  • The front of your work is always facing you (this is the right side, the side showing the design)
  • You are always working from the right to the left (opposite for left-handed crocheters)
  • You tie on a new yarn at the beginning of each row and cut it at the end
    • Tails don’t need to be longer than an inch and a half (unless you want to use them as fringe, like on scarf)
  • Yarn colors can be anything you like
    • They need to contrast well (try a black and white photo to see if they are too similar)
    • They need to be the same weight (size/thickness)
  • Odd-numbered rows use MC (coral), even-numbered rows use CC (light blue)

Optional “Locked Double Crochet”

To prevent the small flaps on the back of your work, consider locking-in your stitch.

Begin like a dropped double crochet: skip the next stitch, and work into the Front Loop of the stitch in the row below; yarn over, insert hook into front loop below (see first image below), pull up a loop, yarn over, pull through two loops, insert hook into back loop of skipped stitch (see second image below), yarn over and pull through all three loops on your hook.

Time to start crocheting!

(There was an error with this blog but it has been fixed! I am so sorry! And majorly embarrassed 🙈)

Row 1 can be your foundation row OR you can add it to another section.

Repeat between *’s as many times as required for your project.

Foundation Row:

Row 1 MC – Can use a chainless single crochet foundation or you can chain the desired number of stitches, plus one for turning chain. Turn, skip turning chain, single crochet into each chain.

Repeats of 48 +3 = desired number of stitches

For example, if you want to repeat the design twice: (48 x 2) + 3 = 99 sc needed (chain 99 + 1 = 100, skip 1 stitch, sc into the rest of the 99)

Or, if you want to repeat the design three times: (48 x 3) + 3 = 147 sc needed (chain 147 + 1 = 148, skip 1 stitch, sc into the rest of the 147)

OR when added to another project:

Repeat between *’s as many times as required for your project.

1 MC JS, *sc48*, sc1, ES

2 CC – JS, *sc48,* sc1, ES

3 MC – JS, *sc5, dc3, sc3, (dc1, sc3) x2, dc3, sc3, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc3, sc3, dc1, sc3, dc3, sc3, dc1,* sc1, ES

4 CC – JS, *dc3, sc5, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc5) x2, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5) x2, dc3, sc1,* sc1, ES

5 MC – JS, *sc3, dc1, sc1, dc3, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc3, sc1, (dc1, sc3) x2, dc3, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc3, sc3, dc1,* sc1, ES

6 CC – JS, *(dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x3, (dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1,* sc1, ES

7 MC – JS, *sc1, (dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, (dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2, (dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc2,* sc1, ES

8 CC – JS, *dc1, sc1, (dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc1, (dc1, sc3) x3, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x4,* sc1, ES

9 MC – JS, *sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5, dc1,* sc1, ES

10 CC – JS, *(dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x2, (dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x3, dc1, sc3,* sc1, ES

11 MC – JS, *(sc1, dc1) x2, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, (dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc2,* sc1, ES

12 CC – JS, *sc2, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc1, (dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x4,* sc1, ES

13 MC – JS, *sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x6, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc3) x2, dc1,* sc1, ES

14 CC – JS, *dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x5, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc3, sc1,* sc1, ES

15 MC – JS, *sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, (dc1, sc3) x5, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc8,* sc1, ES

16 CC – JS, *(dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, dc3, sc1, dc3, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc3, sc1, dc1, sc1, (dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc1, dc8,* sc1, ES

17 MC – JS, *sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc11, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc12,* sc1, ES

18 CC – JS, *dc3, sc1, dc1, sc1, dc3, sc1, dc11, sc1, dc7, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc12,* sc1, ES

19 MC – JS, *sc31, dc1, sc16,* sc1, ES

20 CC – JS, *dc31, sc1, dc16,* sc1, ES

Trim the fringe, if needed.

Continue with the next FATW6 ocean-themed section!

© 2021 Ashlee Brotzell.
All rights reserved. This publication is protected under federal copyright laws. Reproduction or distribution, in whole or in part, in any medium, is strictly prohibited.

What does this mean?
This is an original pattern by Ashlee Brotzell. You may not copy, reproduce, sell, or share any part of it whether for profit or not. This includes, but is not limited to, the written pattern, the chart, and the photos. No translations or video tutorials are allowed.

Sales of your finished items are, of course, unrestricted (and I wish you all the best!). I appreciate credit given to the designer when possible but it is not a requirement. You may tag me @AshleesLint or direct people to my website http://www.ashleeslint.com

Chained Ponds Blanket and Pillow Set

A few weeks ago I published a blanket pattern called “Chained Ponds“. I also created a challenge: finish the blanket in 6 weeks and receive the pillow pattern for free! Three members of my Facebook group were able to complete the blanket in time and win their bonus pattern! Congratulations!

“Chained Ponds” blanket crocheted by danabouch

I planned on the pillow pattern retiring after the promotion. But, I am nothing if not flexible. Due to some suggestions and questions and feedback I have decided to list the pillow pattern after all.

On Ravelry: if you previously purchased the blanket pattern you will receive an automatic $1.50 CAD discount on this pillow pattern. Or, you can add them both to your cart now to receive the $1.50 discount. This discount doesn’t expire (ok, Ravelry requires that I put an expiry date, so I chose Dec 31, 2030, but when the time comes I will just extend that).

For my Etsy users, the pillow pattern will be added to the same listing as the blanket. The price will go up slightly.

Sew together two panels for a big pillow!

The pillow is really a 40-window square and can easily be added to other squares to create a blanket instead. See my list of other squares this size: www.ashleeslint.com/patterns#large

Tropical Tree: Colorful Square in both techniques

I crocheted this palm tree square with a colorful background in both of my favorite techniques: interlocking crochet and overlay mosaic crochet.

One of the things I love about interlocking crochet is that you get a fabulous image without using bobbins or tying and weaving in ends. I did a single crochet graphgan once (see it here), and although it is definitely beautiful to look at, the amount of work involved made it stressful at times.

The simplicity of a two-toned image without tangled yarn balls and 10 more hours of work after you’re “done” is one of the main benefits of my Locked Filet Mesh patterns (LFM = interlocking crochet).

But, I also love how colorful the mosaic patterns can be! Since you are cutting the yarn at the end and joining at the beginning of each row it is really easy to simply grab another color.

The biggest challenge is just to make sure the main color and accent color (or contrasting color) are not too similar. If the colors blend together too much you won’t see the image your yarn is trying to create.

All that being said, this pattern includes instructions on changing colors every few rows. It creates the beachy feel and I think it is worth the effort of weaving in tails (with interlocking crochet). The mosaic version can just use a nice envelope border like usual.

You can grab Tropical Tree on Ravelry. It is just a 20-window square and will join nicely with other 10-inch squares, like my flamingo! See my list of other patterns of this size here: www.ashleeslint.com/patterns#medium

As usual, the back looks striped when done with the overlay mosaic technique and has an almost reverse image when done using interlocking.

I don’t usually change colors with my interlocking patterns so I included a short explanation in the pattern.

I cut and tied off the first color and then joined my new color with a slip knot. More specifically, I put a slip knot on my hook, put it into the stitch I was just working with and pulled a loop up and through the slip knot to make its own slip stitch.

I kept my instagram feed up to date with my progress while crocheting 😉 check it out: instagram.com/ashleeslint

Flamingo Pattern and Locking-in Mosaic Crochet Stitches

I hope you can feel the tropical vibes when you look at this pattern!

I think the colors I used in my overlay mosaic version are a bit more tropical than my interlocking crochet sample.

I was using up scrap yarn when I did the mosaic square so it isn’t exactly how I originally imagined it to be but I am pleased nonetheless. And I used some leftover bulky yarn for the Locked Filet Mesh (LFM / interlocking) sample but without another item for size reference you can’t actually tell in the photos above.

I did submit this pattern to a magazine but I didn’t even get a rejection letter 🙃 I guess they had enough patterns from other amazing designers. It was supposed to be done using fingering weight (8/4, 2 – fine, 4-ply, etc) and be a coaster.

You can get your copy of my Flamingo on ravelry! I may put together a bundle of squares for Etsy later.

The chart is 41 x 41, which means this is a 20-window square when done using the interlocking crochet technique. You can find other squares of this size here and join them together for a custom blanket!

~Interlocking crochet, wrong side~

I used grey as my Main Color (MC) for the interlocking sample because I wanted the pink to be more visible. If you’d rather see a pink flamingo then you need to start with pink!

You may also notice, when comparing the two techniques, that the mosaic flamingo is solid (unlike the background which has “dots” all over the place). I have only attached one chart to this pattern, it has a solid flamingo; when you read the chart for interlocking crochet you skip every other square so your finished flamingo will look like my sample.

The “dots” are created naturally when doing interlocking crochet and I like that they lock in the stitches and use less yarn when doing mosaic crochet. My solid flamingo creates small flaps on the wrong side.

~Upside down, and wrong side, to show the flaps~

I don’t particularly like the small flaps.

I have included the following instructions in the mosaic pattern:

Optional “Locked Double Crochet”

To prevent the small flaps on the back of your work, consider locking-in your stitch.

Begin like a dropped double crochet: skip the next stitch, and work into the Front Loop of the stitch in the row below; yarn over, insert hook into front loop below (see first image below), pull up a loop, yarn over, pull through two loops, insert hook into back loop of skipped stitch (see second image below), yarn over and pull through all three loops on your hook.

~After completing first half of the double crochet (US), insert hook into back loop of stitch usually skipped, yarn over and pull through all 3 loops.~

This extra step is optional but I like how the back stays smooth. You can lock in every other stitch if you prefer.

I can’t wait to see your color combinations! I have included the color for each row in the mosaic version but you, of course, can treat that information as a suggestion and not a hard-and-fast rule.

Mesmur Avenue

I don’t think anyone enjoys the process of moving. The only thing I like is that it means we are no longer living in that apartment! (And I can get back to pattern making; new pattern details at the end of this post!)

We were very thankful to have a warm place to live these last 5 months but I really did not enjoy that place.

I like people who are real and honest without being overly dramatic. So, that is about all I want to say about that tiny apartment, with a terrible kitchen, loud and scary upstairs neighbors, moody and rude administration, with a cockroaches and bed bugs scare (thankfully, we found neither in our apartment).

We are now renting my brother-in-law’s house! They built a new one and we are happy to be in their old place.

My 3 kids, enjoying our first meal in the new place: pizza!

My kids are amazing, as always, and they are handling the chaos well. Plus, they really like the ability to get some space away from each other. Three floors to explore compared to the tiny basement suite!

I have definitely missed my yarn and hooks. I went at least 4 days without touching my crafts! The other night I grabbed my tunisian hooks and some cotton yarn and started making a washcloth. A new house needs a new cloth set.

The tunisian cable is about 10 times too long but a normal hook is about 2 inches too short lol

And a new house needs a new pattern! I present to you, Mesmur Avenue.

I drew this pattern up right before we moved and finished the pattern-writing in the new house.

As usual, grab it on Etsy or Ravelry. Get an automatic 30% discount until 11:59 pm, February 27, 2021.

I prefer Ravelry (thank you to those who have asked!) but I publish on Etsy too because I have a wide customer base and I want it to be accessible to everyone.

And, to answer another frequently asked question: my patterns include written instructions for both the interlocking and overlay mosaic crochet techniques, plus a chart that can be used for both techniques. The charts do not have x’s to denote the dropped stitches for the mosaic, but ai do have a tutorial on YouTube that explains how to read my charts.

These tutorials, and more, are available on YouTube:

Thank you for allowing me to share my art with you all!

A Year of Gnomes

A few weeks ago, you may remember, I published a pattern called, “Gnomesflake” on Ravelry and Etsy.

If you already bought that pattern on Ravelry, or if you buy it now with my new eBook (“A Year of Gnomes”) you will see an exciting discounted price in your cart until February 17, 2021 11:59 pm!

Gnomes seem to be very popular right now. And, yes, I agree, they are cute! I like it when they can’t see past their giant hats.

My earlier, “Gnomesflake” pattern

When I was drawing that pattern (Gnomesflake) I played around with a few different gnome designs. I thought it would be pretty cute to do a monthly gnome. Does it count as an impromptu, year-long CAL (Crochet-A-Long) then?

I also really like these oversized afghan squares (chart 81 x 81). I feel like it’s a manageable size (instead of a big, overwhelming blanket). And I like that it makes it easy to use lots of colors in one blanket.

I definitely prefer to use the interlocking technique when making these squares. It is quicker for me and there are no tails to worry about.

I do like the way the envelope border looks around a mosaic project. And you can easily join two bordered squares. But it seems like a lot of extra work, in my opinion.

These squares also work well as pillows, and if I was to use the overlay mosaic crochet technique for a pillow I would just tuck the tails inside. No border, no weaving in ends.

I was a little slow in getting January’s Gnome published. I’ve just published both January and February tonight. I will publish a new gnome each month this year.

The eBook on Ravelry will be updated each month. Etsy doesn’t have a system for updating listings so I will have to email you each month’s new pattern as it comes out.

I have a few promotions on Ravelry for these new squares:

*buy January Gnome, get February Gnome free (you must add both to your cart)

*buy the ebook, “A Year of Gnomes” and the earlier pattern, “Gnomesflake” and get a discounted price (past purchases count! If you already bought Gnomesflake just add the new eBook to your cart and you should see a discount!)

Both of these promotions end February 17, 2021 11:59 pm.

If you’re an Etsy-only shopper, these are 30% off until February 17, 2021 11:59 pm:

January Gnome
February Gnome
The eBook: “A Year of Gnomes”. So far, only 2 gnomes are available.

Master List of Gnomes Patterns

3000 FB members = free pattern!

I am blown away by how fast my Facebook group has grown! I created the group in April, 2020 after deciding to publish my first crochet pattern to Ravelry.

I wanted it to be a place where people could “meet” me, get help with the patterns (interlocking crochet is a new technique for a lot of people), and crochet together as a group!

I have hosted 3 CALs (Crochet-A-Longs) since I began. And I learned a lot each time. The 3rd CAL was also offered in mosaic crochet and I think that really brought in a lot of new members.

There are now more than 3000 members in Ashlee’s Interlocking and Mosaic Crochet Facebook group!

I like to celebrate milestones 🙂

I should have prepared sooner. It took my surprise.

I went into my half-finished files to see which pattern I could quickly finish to offer as a free celebratory pattern. The first one I picked was not nearly close enough to finished. I spent about twenty minutes on that drawing before I said, wait, the group is already at 3000 members, I need something NOW!

The next chart I opened was ready for publishing. I exported it and started to work on the written instructions. After an hour I realized these written instructions were just too busy for a quick free pattern. I will finish both of those projects eventually, but I really need to find something in my files that is ready NOW! Lol

Then it was bedtime for my kids so I had to walk away from my work. Brushing teeth, changing, stalling, crying, snuggling, etc. It takes a long time, and last night was one of the exta long adventures.

Eventually I did get back to my computer. But I got distracted with drawing something else that’s been in my mental to-do list. It is ready, by the way: a valentine’s day surprise!

But, I still had no pattern to give away in celebration. Then I remembered the blanket my 6-year-old daughter wanted me to make for her.

A few finishing touches on the drawing and it was ready for me to work some magic with typing. The instructions did take me longer than I anticipated (like, all day).

But, I was tired of switching my projects so I stuck with it.

It is probably not something that EVERYONE will like. I can’t please everyone. But I am pretty sure that at least some of you will like it. And, hey, it’s free!

Now presenting: Common Unicorn

Unicorns are not rare in my house. Sparkles and rainbows and pastel colors are our favorites. Especially in shades of pink.

It is written up for both my favorite techniques: interlocking and overlay mosaic crochet. And of course, there is a chart.

Check out my YouTube channel if you need a tutorial on either of those techniques or how to use the chart.

I am putting the pattern in the files section of my Facebook group (that is free!). I will also publish it to Etsy and Ravelry for those who don’t use Facebook or for strangers to stumble upon in later days.

It is a throw-sized blanket: the chart is 229 x 237 which should work up to 57″ x 60″ with worsted weight yarn.

When I eventually get around to crocheting this one I think I will do it in mosaic crochet and I will use a rainbow of scrap yarn for my CC (contrasting color). I will probably stick with black or a dark purple or blue for the MC (main color).

I can’t wait to see what you guys come up with. I love seeing the various color choices!

Anneke used a rainbow self-striping yarn for the MC!