Creating A Chart on YouTube Live

I just finished a live video on YouTube where I showed you how I create my charts!

I go over the interlocking crochet charts and the overlay mosaic crochet charts. I even show you the computer program I use.

I hope you will find it informative and helpful if you’re trying to create your own charts. And if you’d prefer to just buy ones that I design, that’s ok with me too! haha!

Honestly, I believe there is room in this world for everyone’s art! Everyone needs to be creative, just like we need food and air and water. Some people like to create with dirt and growing green things, others use canvas and paints; I use a computer and yarn.

This blog post does not have the same information as the YouTube video. I have simply added a few photos and a downloadable empty chart that you are free to use.

Interlocking Crochet

This is the chart I drew live. It is on a very tiny paper. The grid is 21 x 21 which makes it a 10-window square.

If you’d like to try designing your own, you can download this empty 20-window square. The border lines and the mesh dots are already on there. Technically there are other ways of doing the border lines that allows you to lock the layers together (or not, that is an option too!) but this is how I start all of my patterns. This chart size is 41 x 41. I cut it to get the small grid we used in the live video.

Remember, the mesh dots are not changeable. The white squares are where you can decide if it is going to be blue (the Main Color, the first color, the larger layer) or pink (the inner layer, the Accent Color). Each white square must be filled in – but in my mind they default to pink.

Obviously you can use any yarn color you want, this is just how I have my charts set up when I create a new design.

Using the Chart

After you’ve drawn the chart you’ll need to be able to read it. Please see my tutorials:

Overlay Mosaic Crochet

You don’t have to start with mesh dots on your chart if you’re doing overlay mosaic crochet. I start with the mesh dots because all of my patterns are for both techniques. I despeckle the chart for the mosaic version (older patterns were not despeckled) but you can also start fresh if you’d prefer. I drew this very exciting chart on the live video (that’s sarcasm).

You alternate colors for each row, and if you imagine the “blank canvas” as many rows of SC in BLO (Single Crochet in the Back Loop Only), you can then add a dropped DC (double crochet, US terms) to create the design. You cannot crochet your dropped DC into the other color’s DC. X’s go at the top of each DC.

This is a very basic explanation of how to create a chart, but if you get familiar with the stitches I think this is actually all the information you need! If it doesn’t make sense, don’t worry, maybe our brains just work a bit differently and someone else will explain it in a way that makes sense to you.

Try, try, try again!

Programs

Inevitably, someone will ask what program I use. It’s not a secret, I have mentioned it a few times. I prefer to use Winstitch. I started with graph paper and a pen, tried excel and Stitch Fiddle, but I am comfortable with Winstitch now and don’t want to learn any more programs.

Winstitch is a cross stitch program. It starts with a grid. I created a motif of the blue and pink dots that I use multiple times for every pattern. The computer program gives me the stitch counts – quick, and no human error! But the exported information is not what I’d consider usable for a pattern, so I created over 900 pages of Microsoft Word macros and I copy and paste the information from the Winstitch export into Word and then do a bunch of editing to make a pattern for sale.

Winstitch also does not “do” mosaic crochet. But I create a bunch of files and copy and paste things together to get the stitch counts. For my more recent patterns I adjust the charts to remove the mesh dots before creating the mosaic pattern.

If you’re going to try creating your own patterns for sale, please remember that you can’t use copyrighted or trademarked material. People expect to see a key or some sort of explanation as to how they are to use whatever information you are giving them. And page numbers plus the pattern name in the header can really help make your pattern more user-friendly.

A few months ago I offered my pattern keys to anyone. You can use them as a starting place and edit as you see fit. Copy and paste them from this post I wrote about Copyright. I would suggest you also include some sort of copyright statement in your patterns. Again, you can use my statement, just make sure you edit it to have your name instead of mine!

Blooming Owl Wall Hanging

My musical husband has a guitar strap on his classical wooden guitar with these floral motifs. Everytime I see it I think of an owl.

Obviously I couldn’t just draw it as it is, but I think I captured the idea of a flowery owl in my newest wall hanging: Blooming Owl.

My husband loves it!

I used fingering weight yarn. This is also called 4-ply or 8/4 depending on where you live. Craft Council lists it as a weight 1 – super fine and states it can also be called sock yarn.

The black yarn is “110 Jet Black” Scheepjes Catona. It is 100% mercerized cotton. The small balls are only 50 grams and have 125 metres of yarn. Scheepjes suggests a 2.5 – 3.5 mm needle (I believe that specifically refers to knitting needles). I used a 2.5 mm crochet hook.

I used a full 2 balls. There was barely anything left over (see photo below). So, make sure you match my gauge or grab an extra skein. If you’re going to grab an extra one you might as well grab two! 😉

The gold yarn is actually called “Copper” (oops, it is called “Ginger”). It is from SweetGeorgia Yarns’ Tough Love Sock Yarn line. We looked online at YarnCanada.ca and I gave Mitch a few options. He said this color was “it” and he didn’t care that it was also the most expensive.

It comes in a twisted hank of 115 grams which gives you 425 yards of soft, silky wool. I only used half the skein.

It cost me $3.65 CAD per ball of Catona, so $7.30 total (but I did buy a 3rd ball just in case). The Tough Love Sock yarn was $33.95 but I only used half, so it cost me about $17 for this project. It felt really expensive to buy the fancy color Mitch wanted but it was so worth it because this is just beautiful to look at.

It was my first time using my fancy yarn swift! It is fun having toys! This is one of the more expensive things I own (related to yarn crafts). I don’t usually buy yarn that comes twisted because it just gets all tangled up. This was easy to set up and I turned the hank into a cake in a few short minutes!

The “Tough Love Sock Yarn” is 80% merino wool with 20% polyamide. Because it is a hand-dyed yarn it gives my finished piece a sort of mottled look where the dying process created slightly different shades in the yarn.

Like all of my patterns, this pattern is written for my two favorite techniques: interlocking crochet and overlay mosaic crochet. You can choose to use your favorite method or you can try something new!

I used the mosaic method because I wanted the fringe on the bottom and I wanted to use the strings at the top to attach the wooden dowel. I created a short YouTube tutorial with some tricks for attaching the dowel.

YouTube tutorial: Adding a Dowel

If you use interlocking crochet for your project you can add fringe to the bottom and whipstitch the dowel to the top. Instructions are included in the PDF pattern.

Both techniques work the design starting at the top-right corner going down to the bottom-right corner. I designed it to sideways because of the mosaic fringe.

The PDF includes written line-by-line instructions for both techniques and two charts; one is marked with x’s for overlay mosaic crochet. I haven’t created a YouTube video on how to use the x-marked charts yet. I have only just started updating my patterns to include a marked chart.

The other chart can be used for both techniques and I have tutorials on YouTube for that!

Grab your copy of my “Blooming Owl Wall Hanging” on Etsy or Ravelry and get 15% off your entire cart*!

*no code needed, offer ends 11:59 pm, CST, July 13, 2021.

Pin this! https://pin.it/6jorpDe

Tropical Tree: Colorful Square in both techniques

I crocheted this palm tree square with a colorful background in both of my favorite techniques: interlocking crochet and overlay mosaic crochet.

One of the things I love about interlocking crochet is that you get a fabulous image without using bobbins or tying and weaving in ends. I did a single crochet graphgan once (see it here), and although it is definitely beautiful to look at, the amount of work involved made it stressful at times.

The simplicity of a two-toned image without tangled yarn balls and 10 more hours of work after you’re “done” is one of the main benefits of my Locked Filet Mesh patterns (LFM = interlocking crochet).

But, I also love how colorful the mosaic patterns can be! Since you are cutting the yarn at the end and joining at the beginning of each row it is really easy to simply grab another color.

The biggest challenge is just to make sure the main color and accent color (or contrasting color) are not too similar. If the colors blend together too much you won’t see the image your yarn is trying to create.

All that being said, this pattern includes instructions on changing colors every few rows. It creates the beachy feel and I think it is worth the effort of weaving in tails (with interlocking crochet). The mosaic version can just use a nice envelope border like usual.

You can grab Tropical Tree on Ravelry. It is just a 20-window square and will join nicely with other 10-inch squares, like my flamingo! See my list of other patterns of this size here: www.ashleeslint.com/patterns#medium

As usual, the back looks striped when done with the overlay mosaic technique and has an almost reverse image when done using interlocking.

I don’t usually change colors with my interlocking patterns so I included a short explanation in the pattern.

I cut and tied off the first color and then joined my new color with a slip knot. More specifically, I put a slip knot on my hook, put it into the stitch I was just working with and pulled a loop up and through the slip knot to make its own slip stitch.

I kept my instagram feed up to date with my progress while crocheting 😉 check it out: instagram.com/ashleeslint

Flamingo Pattern and Locking-in Mosaic Crochet Stitches

I hope you can feel the tropical vibes when you look at this pattern!

I think the colors I used in my overlay mosaic version are a bit more tropical than my interlocking crochet sample.

I was using up scrap yarn when I did the mosaic square so it isn’t exactly how I originally imagined it to be but I am pleased nonetheless. And I used some leftover bulky yarn for the Locked Filet Mesh (LFM / interlocking) sample but without another item for size reference you can’t actually tell in the photos above.

I did submit this pattern to a magazine but I didn’t even get a rejection letter 🙃 I guess they had enough patterns from other amazing designers. It was supposed to be done using fingering weight (8/4, 2 – fine, 4-ply, etc) and be a coaster.

You can get your copy of my Flamingo on ravelry! I may put together a bundle of squares for Etsy later.

The chart is 41 x 41, which means this is a 20-window square when done using the interlocking crochet technique. You can find other squares of this size here and join them together for a custom blanket!

~Interlocking crochet, wrong side~

I used grey as my Main Color (MC) for the interlocking sample because I wanted the pink to be more visible. If you’d rather see a pink flamingo then you need to start with pink!

You may also notice, when comparing the two techniques, that the mosaic flamingo is solid (unlike the background which has “dots” all over the place). I have only attached one chart to this pattern, it has a solid flamingo; when you read the chart for interlocking crochet you skip every other square so your finished flamingo will look like my sample.

The “dots” are created naturally when doing interlocking crochet and I like that they lock in the stitches and use less yarn when doing mosaic crochet. My solid flamingo creates small flaps on the wrong side.

~Upside down, and wrong side, to show the flaps~

I don’t particularly like the small flaps.

I have included the following instructions in the mosaic pattern:

Optional “Locked Double Crochet”

To prevent the small flaps on the back of your work, consider locking-in your stitch.

Begin like a dropped double crochet: skip the next stitch, and work into the Front Loop of the stitch in the row below; yarn over, insert hook into front loop below (see first image below), pull up a loop, yarn over, pull through two loops, insert hook into back loop of skipped stitch (see second image below), yarn over and pull through all three loops on your hook.

~After completing first half of the double crochet (US), insert hook into back loop of stitch usually skipped, yarn over and pull through all 3 loops.~

This extra step is optional but I like how the back stays smooth. You can lock in every other stitch if you prefer.

I can’t wait to see your color combinations! I have included the color for each row in the mosaic version but you, of course, can treat that information as a suggestion and not a hard-and-fast rule.

Abstract Queen CAL: Interlocking Part 15

December 8, 2020: Part 15 – Rows 337-358

Crocheted by Emily Harmon using the interlocking crochet technique

Wow! You did it! This is the final section!

I am in love with every blanket I have seen, and I just know yours is gorgeous too!

Thank you so much for participating in my 3rd CAL! These blog posts will remain free forever, and I am looking forward to years and years of new Abstract Queen blankets being made.

In the here and now (December 2020) I have been creating some new holiday squares. I mentioned them last week. This is the list of patterns on sale on Ravelry (use code “Holiday20” to get 20% off until Dec. 31, 2020):

I also have 2 new Holiday bundles on Etsy now. The first 5 new squares are in bundle 1, and the 2nd batch is in bundle 2. I will have at least a 3rd bundle (but not sure about a 4th bundle).

Go back to the main Abstract Queen landing page if you want to find the mosaic version or the list of dates of each release.

Subscribe to receive weekly updates by email!

The free parts on the blog do not include the chart, but you can purchase the pattern on Ravelry or Etsy, where you will receive the chart and instructions for both techniques in a nice printable PDF. I really appreciate the support!

Join my Ravelry group or Facebook group share your progress, no matter when you start!

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Interlocking Information

  • US crochet terminology
  • Chart is 359 x 321 = 115,239 stitches!
  • Finished size 90” x 80” (Queen plus drape)
  • 4.5 mm hook (US7)
  • Worsted weight yarn (8250 yards)
    • Main color (black in chart) – 4100 yards plus 50 yards for optional SC border
    • Accent color – 4100 yards
  • Gauge: 16 DC x 8 rows = 4”

Key for Interlocking Crochet

AC = Accent Color. Second color used.
MC = Main Color. First color used.
RS = right side: the side of your work that will show the finished design
WS = wrong side: the back of your project
Front = the side currently facing you
Back = the side not facing you
Ch = chain
Sp = space
Sk = skip a stitch
SC = single crochet
DC = double crochet
F = DC in front, then CH 1
B = DC behind, then CH 1
ES = DC into the last window space
EF = end stitch in front: using AC, DC into the last AC window, working in front of MC
EB = end stitch in back: using AC, DC into the last AC window, working behind MC
ACF = bring the AC yarn to the side facing you
ACB = put AC yarn to the side facing away from you

Notes

  • If you chain tighter than me you may need to Ch 4 where I Ch 3
  • Don’t confuse RS / WS with Front / Back
  • Remember, each color is worked into itself only and there is a chain space between each DC
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I have repeated the final row from last week here – pay attention to what row you’re on!

WS – ACB

336 MC – Ch3, 1B, (1F, 1B, 1F, 5B, 1F, 1B, 15F, 1B, 1F, 5B, 1F, 1B, 1F, 3B) x4, 1F, 1B, 1F, 3B, ES

337 AC – Ch3 in back, {(1B, 1F) x5, (1B, 2F) x5, (1B, 1F) x5, 1B, 2F} x4, (1B, 1F) x3, EB

RS – ACF

338 MC – Ch3, 1F, 4B, {1F, (1B, 1F) x2, 7B, (1F, 1B) x2, (2F, 1B) x3, 2F, (1B, 1F) x2, 7B} x4, 2F, ES

339 AC – Ch3 in front, {1B, 1F, (1B, 2F) x3, 1B, 1F, 1B, 2F, 1B, 18F, 1B, 2F} x4, 1B, 1F, 1B, 2F, 1B, EF

WS – ACB

340 MC – Ch3, 1B, {1F, 5B, 1F, 1B, 2F, 1B, 1F, (2B, 1F) x4, 1B, 2F, 1B, 1F, 5B, 1F, 3B} x4, 1F, 5B, ES

341 AC – Ch3 in back, {(1B, 1F) x4, 3B, 2F, (1B, 2F) x4, 3B, (1F, 1B) x4, 2F} x4, (1B, 1F) x3, EB

RS – ACF

342 MC – Ch3, 1F, 6B, 1F, 7B, {1F, 21B, (1F, 7B) x2} x3, 1F, 21B, 1F, 6B, 1F, ES

343 AC – Ch3 in front, {2F, 1B, 1F, 1B, 4F, 1B, 1F, 1B, 2F, 1B, (1F, 2B) x7, 1F, 1B} x4, 2F, (1B, 1F) x2, EF

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WS – ACB

344 MC – Ch3, 5B, {1F, (1B, 1F) x2, (2B, 1F) x6, (1B, 1F) x2, 11B} x4, 1F, 1B, ES

345 AC – Ch3 in back, {(1B, 1F) x3, 24B, (1F, 1B) x3, 2F} x4, (1B, 1F) x3, EB

RS – ACF

346 MC – Ch3, 2F, {(5B, 1F) x2, 2B, 1F, 1B, (2F, 1B) x2, 5F, 1B, (2F, 1B) x2, 1F, 2B, 1F} x4, 4B, 1F, ES

347 AC – Ch3 in front, 1F, {1B, 2F, 1B, 4F, 1B, 2F, 1B, 3F, (2B, 1F) x2, 2B, 4F, (2B, 1F) x2, 2B, 3F} x4, 1B, 2F, 1B, 1F, EF

WS – ACB

348 MC – Ch3, 3B, (1F, 1B, 12F, 3B, 12F, 1B, 1F, 7B) x4, (1F, 1B) x2, ES

349 AC – Ch3 in back, {1B, (1F, 1B) x2, (2F, 1B) x3, 2F, 4B, (2F, 1B) x4, (1F, 1B) x2, 2F} x4, 1B, (1F, 1B) x2, 1F, EB

RS – ACF

350 MC – Ch3, 2F, {1B, (1F, 3B) x2, (1F, 1B) x2, (2F, 1B) x2, 2F, 2B, 3F, 2B, (2F, 1B) x3, 1F} x4, 1B, 1F, 2B, 1F, ES

351 AC – Ch3 in front, 3F, (1B, 6F, 1B, 12F, 2B, 2F, 2B, 12F) x4, 1B, 2F, EF

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WS – ACB

352 MC – Ch3, 1B, {1F, 1B, 2F, 1B, 1F, (2B, 1F) x2, 3B, 2F, 1B, 2F, 3B, 1F, (2B, 1F) x2, 1B, 2F, 1B, 1F, 3B} x4, 1F, 1B, 2F, 2B, ES

353 AC – Ch3 in back, {1B, 1F, 3B, (2F, 1B) x2, 2F, 3B, 4F, 3B, (2F, 1B) x2, 2F, 3B, 1F, 1B, 2F, 1B, 1F, 3B, (2F, 1B) x2, 2F, 3B, 4F, 3B, (2F, 1B) x2, 2F, 3B, 1F, 1B, 2F} x2, 1B, 1F, 3B, 1F, EB

RS – ACF

354 MC – Ch3, 1F, 4B, {1F, (1B, 1F) x2, 13B, 2F, 3B, 2F, 13B} x4, 2F, ES

355 AC – Ch3 in front, 1B, 1F, 2B, {1F, 1B, 2F, 1B, 1F, (2B, 1F) x3, 4B, 6F, 4B, 1F, (2B, 1F) x2, 2B} x4, 1F, 1B, EF

WS – ACF*

356 MC – Ch3, (1B, 1F) x2, {(2B, 1F) x2, 1B, 5F, 1B, 3F, 1B, 5F, 1B, 1F, (2B, 1F) x2, (1B, 1F) x4} x4, 3B, ES

357 AC – Ch3 in front, 158F, EF

Cut and tie off AC

RS

358 MC – Ch3, 159B, ES

Cut and tie off, OR continue with border.

SC Border

Ch1, put 2 SC in each gap on all four sides. Add an extra ch2 space in each corner (corner gap will have 2sc, 2ch, 2sc).

FINISHED!

Take a picture and share it!

@Ashleeslint #lockedfiletmeshcrochet

Abstract Queen CAL: Mosaic Part 15

December 8, 2020: Part 15 – Rows 337-358

Nina Mayer’s finished blanket!

Wow! You did it! This is the final section!

I am in love with every blanket I have seen, and I just know yours is gorgeous too!

Thank you so much for participating in my 3rd CAL! These blog posts will remain free forever, and I am looking forward to years and years of new Abstract Queen blankets being made.

In the here and now (December 2020) I have been creating some new holiday squares. I mentioned them last week. This is the list of patterns on sale on Ravelry (use code “Holiday20” to get 20% off until Dec. 31, 2020):

I also have 2 new Holiday bundles on Etsy now. The first 5 new squares are in bundle 1, and the 2nd batch is in bundle 2. I will have at least a 3rd bundle (but not sure about a 4th bundle).

Go back to the main Abstract Queen landing page if you want to find the interlocking version or the list of dates of each release. Scroll down to find the pattern.

Subscribe to receive weekly updates by email!

The free parts on the blog do not include the chart, but you can purchase the pattern on Ravelry or Etsy, where you will receive the chart and instructions for both techniques. I really appreciate the support!

Join my Ravelry group or Facebook group share your progress, no matter when you start!

Advertisements

Mosaic Key

MC = Main Color: blue in chart
CC = Contrasting Color: white in chart
Sp = space
Sk = skip a stitch
CH = chain
SC = single crochet
sc = SC into Back Loop only
DC = double crochet
dc = DC into Front Loop of stitch, 2 rows below
JS = Joining Stitch: insert hook under both loops, pull up a loop, slip stitch, SC in same space
ES = End Stitch: SC under both loops, CH 1, cut yarn and pull through tightly

Mosaic Technique

  • Remember to skip the same number of stitch(es) behind your dc(s) before doing your next sc
  • The front of your work is always facing you (this is the right side, the side showing the design)
  • You are always working from the right to the left
  • You tie on a new yarn at the beginning of each row and cut it at the end
    • Tails don’t need to be longer than an inch and a half
  • Yarn colors can be anything you like
    • They need to contrast well (try a black and white photo to see if they are too similar)
    • They need to be the same weight (size/thickness)
    • My charts use black as the Main Color and white as the Coordinating Color
  • I prefer using a chainless SC to create my foundation row because then I have tails on both sides of my work just like all the other rows will have
  • Even-numbered rows use MC; odd-numbered rows use CC
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Next part of the pattern begins here:

337 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc3) x3, {dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc3) x5, (dc1, sc5) x5, (dc1, sc3) x5} x4, (dc1, sc1) x2, ES

338 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc9, {(dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc15, (dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x4, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc15} x4, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, ES

339 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc3) x2, {(dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x3, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x16, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc3} x4, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, ES

340 – JS, (dc1, sc1) x5, {dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x4, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x4, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x4} x4, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

341 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc3) x3, {dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc3) x4, (dc1, sc1) x2, (dc1, sc5) x5, (dc1, sc1) x2, (dc1, sc3) x4} x4, (dc1, sc1) x2, ES

342 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc15, {dc1, sc43, (dc1, sc15) x2} x3, dc1, sc43, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

343 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x2, {(dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x3, (dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc5) x7, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1} x4, (dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2, ES

344 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, {(dc1, sc1) x10, (dc1, sc3) x3, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x6, (dc1, sc3) x2} x4, (dc1, sc1) x5, dc1, ES

345 – JS, sc1, {(dc1, sc3) x3, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc3) x3, (dc1, sc1) x23} x4, (dc1, sc3) x3, (dc1, sc1) x2, ES

346 – JS, (dc1, sc1) x2, {(dc1, sc11) x2, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x3, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x3, dc1, sc5} x4, dc1, sc9, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

347 – JS, sc1, [{(dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2} x2, (dc1, sc5) x3, (dc1, sc1) x3, (dc1, sc5) x3, dc1, sc1] x4, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2, ES

348 – JS, dc1, sc1, (dc1, sc3) x2, {(dc1, sc1) x6, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc25, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc25, dc1, sc3} x4, (dc1, sc1) x3, dc1, ES

349 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc3) x3, {dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc5) x4, (dc1, sc1) x3, (dc1, sc5) x4, (dc1, sc3) x2} x4, (dc1, sc1) x2, ES

350 – JS, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, {(dc1, sc7) x2, (dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x3, dc1, sc3} x4, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

351 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x3, dc1, sc3, {(dc1, sc1) x5, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x10, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5) x2, (dc1, sc1) x11, dc1, sc3} x4, (dc1, sc1) x3, ES

352 – JS, (dc1, sc1) x2, {dc1, sc5, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1) x3, dc1, sc1, (dc1, sc5) x2, dc1, sc1, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x3} x4, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

353 – JS, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, {dc1, sc3, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, (dc1, sc5) x3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc9, (dc1, sc1) x2, (dc1, sc5) x3, (dc1, sc1) x2} x4, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, ES

354 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc9, {(dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc27, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc27} x4, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, ES

355 – JS, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, {dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc5) x3, dc1, sc9, (dc1, sc1) x5, dc1, sc9, (dc1, sc5) x3, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1} x4, ES

356 – JS, (dc1, sc1) x3, (dc1, sc3) x5, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, {dc1, sc11, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc11, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc3) x4, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2} x3, dc1, sc11, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc11, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

357 – JS, sc321, ES

358 – JS, dc1, sc319, dc1, ES

WOW! You made it! You did it!

Now, what to do with all those tails?

You can add an envelope border if you want, see my post about that here. Other options include taking a needle and weaving every tail in. Go under and through the same-colored yarn to hide them well. Or you could simply knot them and trim them to be the same size and leave a visible fringe. You can also make a few macrame knots and turn your fringe into something slightly fancier. I’ve even seen people add beads!

You’re FINISHED!

Take a picture and share it!

@Ashleeslint #lockedfiletmeshcrochet

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Among Us – turning a hat into a character

So, if you live under a rock, you may not have seen any of these “Among Us” toys, hats, etc. I admit, it took me longer than most to figure out why everyone kept using the phrase “sus”.

My bestie asked me to make her son a stuffy and a hat.

I *mostly* followed a pattern I found online for the little amigurumi guy. I couldn’t get the eye… goggle… face thing? I don’t know what it is, but mine wasn’t working so I had to free hand it a bit.

There are lots of free patterns out there, make sure you do use a FREE one because the creators of Among Us have been clear about their wishes: read about that here.

So, here is my little guy:

See his little wolf ears? Special request. I did 3 chains in a magic circle, then 2 single crochets in each stitch around (6). I then did one more round of sc. Flatten and sew on.

The pattern I followed made weird goggles so I kind if squished and shaped them into something I liked better.

Then I made a hat. A basic beanie.

For the matching wolf ears I had to do a lot more than 3 rounds lol

For these big wolf ears I started with 4 single crochets in a magic circle. Increase all the way around (that means put 2 sc in each stitch).

I didn’t join the rows, I was just working in rounds, so make sure you grab a stitch marker!

3rd round: repeat *sc, inc* (12)

4: repeat *2 sc, inc* (16)

5: repeat *inc, 3 sc* (20) (I moved the increase to avoid a spiral line)

6: repeat *4 sc, inc* (24)

7: repeat * 2 sc, inc, inc, 8 sc* (26)

8: repeat *inc, 12 sc* (28)

9 sc around. Cut and tie off. Leave a long tail for sewing.

Flatten the cone into an ear. Make sure you curve it strongly. Use stitch markers to place both ears on the hat before sewing.

You want them to match up! And you don’t want to have to cut your work off and redo it.

The goggle part on the hat is a 2D item instead of 3D like on the little amigurumi.

To make an oval:

Chain 17, sc in 2nd from hook and across (16).

Don’t turn your work, sc in each stitch along the bottom of your work (+ 16, 32 for this round).

Round 3: increase (put 2 sc in the same stitch), sc x14, inc in both of the next 2 stitches, sc 14, inc.

Round 4: inc, inc, sc x 14, inc x 3, sc 14, inc. Cut and tie off, leave a long tail for sewing.

Give it a try!

Abstract Queen CAL: Mosaic Part 14

December 1, 2020: Part 14 – Rows 313-336

Nina Mayer’s nearly-finished blanket!

As we near the end of this CAL, I am thankful for all the support and love I’ve received over the last few months! You guys make me want to keep designing, so here’s some new squares for you!

Right now, they are only available on Ravelry but I will get them set up on Etsy as a bundle when I’ve got more to add with them. On Ravelry I have added all my holiday patterns into a sale bundle! Use code, “Holiday20“, to get 20% off any of these patterns until Dec. 31, 2020:

Dec 1 UPDATE: I have created an ebook for my new holiday squares! It is not included in the sale but by the time I am done adding patterns to it you will be saving a minimum of 30%. If you know you’re going to get all the new squares then this is the better deal for you 🙂

Get the ebook on Ravelry here

Go back to the main Abstract Queen landing page if you want to find the interlocking version or the list of dates of each release. Scroll down to find the pattern.

Subscribe to receive weekly updates by email!

The free parts on the blog do not include the chart, but you can purchase the pattern on Ravelry or Etsy, where you will receive the chart and instructions for both techniques. I really appreciate the support!

Join my Ravelry group or Facebook group share your progress, no matter when you start! And create a project page on Ravelry linked to the Abstract Queen pattern to be entered to win one of the weekly prizes!

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Mosaic Key

MC = Main Color: blue in chart
CC = Contrasting Color: white in chart
Sp = space
Sk = skip a stitch
CH = chain
SC = single crochet
sc = SC into Back Loop only
DC = double crochet
dc = DC into Front Loop of stitch, 2 rows below
JS = Joining Stitch: insert hook under both loops, pull up a loop, slip stitch, SC in same space
ES = End Stitch: SC under both loops, CH 1, cut yarn and pull through tightly

Mosaic Technique

  • Remember to skip the same number of stitch(es) behind your dc(s) before doing your next sc
  • The front of your work is always facing you (this is the right side, the side showing the design)
  • You are always working from the right to the left
  • You tie on a new yarn at the beginning of each row and cut it at the end
    • Tails don’t need to be longer than an inch and a half
  • Yarn colors can be anything you like
    • They need to contrast well (try a black and white photo to see if they are too similar)
    • They need to be the same weight (size/thickness)
    • My charts use black as the Main Color and white as the Coordinating Color
  • I prefer using a chainless SC to create my foundation row because then I have tails on both sides of my work just like all the other rows will have
  • Even-numbered rows use MC; odd-numbered rows use CC
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Next part of the pattern begins here:

313 – JS, sc1, dc1, sc1, {(dc1, sc1) x12, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc5} x7, (dc1, sc1) x5, ES

314 – JS, (dc1, sc1) x3, {dc1, sc3, dc1, sc29, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2} x7, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

315 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x2, {dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x11, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x5} x7, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, ES

316 – JS, (dc1, sc1) x2, {dc1, sc29, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1} x7, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

317 – JS, sc1, dc1, sc1, {dc1, sc7, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x12, dc1, sc5} x7, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc1, ES

318 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc1, {dc1, sc3, dc1, sc17, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc1} x7, dc1, ES

319 – JS, sc1, dc1, sc317, dc1, sc1, ES

320 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc315, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

321 – JS, sc1, dc1, sc317, dc1, sc1, ES

322 – JS, dc1, sc1, {(dc1, sc3) x3, (dc1, sc1) x2, (dc1, sc3) x3, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc15, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc15, dc1, sc5} x4, (dc1, sc3) x3, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

323 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x15, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc3, {(dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x3, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x16, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc3} x3, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x3, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x9, ES

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324 – JS, dc1, sc1, (dc1, sc3) x3, {(dc1, sc1) x2, (dc1, sc3) x5, (dc1, sc1) x4, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x4, (dc1, sc3) x5} x4, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

325 – JS, sc1, dc1, sc5, [(dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5) x3, {(dc1, sc3) x5, dc1, sc5} x2] x4, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, ES

326 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc13, (dc1, sc15) x2, {(dc1, sc3) x3, (dc1, sc15) x4} x3, (dc1, sc3) x3, dc1, sc15, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

327 – JS, (sc1, dc1) x2, {sc5, (dc1, sc1) x7, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, (dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x4, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1} x4, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x4, ES

328 – JS, dc1, sc1, {dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc7) x2, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x4, (dc1, sc3, dc1, sc5) x2, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x4, dc1, sc3} x4, (dc1, sc5) x2, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

329 – JS, sc1, dc1, sc3, {dc1, sc1, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2, (dc1, sc3) x5, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x2, (dc1, sc3) x5} x4, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, ES

330 – JS, (dc1, sc1) x2, {(dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1) x2, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc15, dc1, sc19, dc1, sc15} x4, (dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, ES

331 – JS, (sc1, dc1) x2, {sc3, (dc1, sc1) x8, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc5) x3, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, (dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc1, dc1} x4, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x5, ES

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332 – JS, dc1, sc1, {(dc1, sc3) x3, (dc1, sc1) x2, (dc1, sc3) x3, (dc1, sc1) x4, (dc1, sc3) x3, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x4} x4, (dc1, sc3) x3, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

333 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc3) x2, {dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc3) x5, (dc1, sc1) x11, (dc1, sc3) x5} x4, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, ES

334 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc5, {(dc1, sc7) x2, dc1, sc15, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc15} x4, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

335 – JS, sc1, [dc1, sc3, {dc1, sc1, (dc1, sc3) x2} x3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, (dc1, sc5) x3, dc1, sc1, (dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3) x2] x4, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x3, ES

336 – JS, (dc1, sc1) x3, {(dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x2, (dc1, sc3) x2, (dc1, sc1) x4, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc31, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x4} x4, (dc1, sc3) x2, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

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Come back next week for your next dose 😉

Don’t forget to update your Ravelry Project to be entered to win the weekly prize! And check your Ravelry inbox for a message from me, because I have noticed that not many of the coupons have been used yet!

Abstract Queen CAL: Interlocking Part 13

November 24, 2020: Part 13 – Rows 289-312

Crocheted by Emily Harmon using the interlocking crochet technique

This week’s big news: Black Friday sale ALL WEEK LONG! Everything in my Ravelry and Etsy stores is 25% off! No code needed. Sale ends Nov 29, 2020!

You will see this same introduction on each part of the CAL. Scroll down to find the pattern instructions you’re looking for.

Go back to the main Abstract Queen landing page if you want to find the mosaic version or the list of dates of each release.

Subscribe to receive weekly updates by email!

The free parts on the blog do not include the chart, but you can purchase the pattern on Ravelry or Etsy, where you will receive the chart and instructions for both techniques in a nice printable PDF. I really appreciate the support!

Join my Ravelry group or Facebook group share your progress, no matter when you start! And create a project page on Ravelry linked to the Abstract Queen pattern to be entered to win one of the weekly prizes!

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Interlocking Information

  • US crochet terminology
  • Chart is 359 x 321 = 115,239 stitches!
  • Finished size 90” x 80” (Queen plus drape)
  • 4.5 mm hook (US7)
  • Worsted weight yarn (8250 yards)
    • Main color (black in chart) – 4100 yards plus 50 yards for optional SC border
    • Accent color – 4100 yards
  • Gauge: 16 DC x 8 rows = 4”

Key for Interlocking Crochet

AC = Accent Color. Second color used.
MC = Main Color. First color used.
RS = right side: the side of your work that will show the finished design
WS = wrong side: the back of your project
Front = the side currently facing you
Back = the side not facing you
Ch = chain
Sp = space
Sk = skip a stitch
SC = single crochet
DC = double crochet
F = DC in front, then CH 1
B = DC behind, then CH 1
ES = DC into the last window space
EF = end stitch in front: using AC, DC into the last AC window, working in front of MC
EB = end stitch in back: using AC, DC into the last AC window, working behind MC
ACF = bring the AC yarn to the side facing you
ACB = put AC yarn to the side facing away from you

Notes

  • If you chain tighter than me you may need to Ch 4 where I Ch 3
  • Don’t confuse RS / WS with Front / Back
  • Remember, each color is worked into itself only and there is a chain space between each DC
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I have repeated the final row from last week here – pay attention to what row you’re on!

WS – ACB

288 MC – Ch3, (2B, 1F, 1B, 8F, 1B, 1F, 2B, 6F) x7, 2B, 1F, 2B, ES

289 AC – Ch3 in back, (1B, 2F, 13B, 2F, 1B, 3F) x7, 1B, 2F, 1B, EB

RS – ACF

290 MC – Ch3, 1F, 6B, (2F, 1B, 3F, 1B, 1F, 14B) x6, 2F, 1B, 3F, 1B, 1F, 11B, 1F, ES

291 AC – Ch3 in front, 4F, (2B, 6F, 2B, 12F) x7, EF

WS – ACB

292 MC – Ch3, (1B, 14F, 2B, 1F, 3B, 1F) x7, 1B, 3F, 1B, ES

293 AC – Ch3 in back, 9B, (2F, 1B, 3F, 1B, 2F, 13B) x6, 2F, 1B, 3F, 1B, 2F, 8B, EB

RS – ACF

294 MC – Ch3, 1F, 3B, (1F, 1B, 2F, 6B, 2F, 1B, 1F, 8B) x7, 1F, ES

295 AC – Ch3 in front, 4F, (2B, 1F, 3B, 1F, 2B, 13F) x7, EF

WS – ACB

296 MC – Ch3, 1B, 8F, (1B, 1F, 3B, 1F, 2B, 14F) x6, 1B, 1F, 3B, 1F, 2B, 9F, 1B, ES

297 AC – Ch3 in back, 9B, (2F, 6B, 2F, 12B) x6, 2F, 6B, 2F, 7B, EB

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RS – ACF

298 MC – Ch3, 1F, 6B, (1F, 1B, 3F, 1B, 2F, 14B) x6, 1F, 1B, 3F, 1B, 2F, 11B, 1F, ES

299 AC – Ch3 in front, 11F, (2B, 1F, 3B, 1F, 2B, 13F) x6, 2B, 1F, 3B, 1F, 2B, 6F, EF

WS – ACB

300 MC – Ch3, 1B, 5F, (1B, 1F, 2B, 6F, 2B, 1F, 1B, 8F) x6, 1B, 1F, 2B, 6F, 2B, 1F, 1B, 6F, 1B, ES

301 AC – Ch3 in back, 10B, (2F, 1B, 3F, 1B, 2F, 13B) x6, 2F, 1B, 3F, 1B, 2F, 7B, EB

RS – ACF

302 MC – Ch3, 1F, 12B, (2F, 1B, 3F, 1B, 1F, 14B) x6, 2F, 1B, 3F, 1B, 1F, 5B, 1F, ES

303 AC – Ch3 in front, 10F, (2B, 6F, 2B, 12F) x6, 2B, 6F, 2B, 6F, EF

WS – ACB

304 MC – Ch3, 1B, 8F, (2B, 1F, 3B, 1F, 1B, 14F) x6, 2B, 1F, 3B, 1F, 1B, 9F, 1B, ES

305 AC – Ch3 in back, 3B, (2F, 1B, 3F, 1B, 2F, 13B) x7, 1F, EB

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RS – ACF

306 MC – Ch3, 2F, (8B, 1F, 1B, 2F, 6B, 2F, 1B, 1F) x7, 2B, 1F, ES

307 AC – Ch3 in front, 10F, (2B, 1F, 3B, 1F, 2B, 13F) x6, 2B, 1F, 3B, 1F, 2B, 7F, EF

WS – ACB

308 MC – Ch3, 1B, 2F, (1B, 1F, 3B, 1F, 2B, 14F) x7, 2B, ES

309 AC – Ch3 in back, 3B, (2F, 6B, 2F, 12B) x7, 1F, EB

RS – ACF

310 MC – Ch3, 1F, 12B, (1F, 1B, 3F, 1B, 2F, 14B) x6, 1F, 1B, 3F, 1B, 2F, 5B, 1F, ES

311 AC – Ch3 in front, 1B, 1F, 2B, (13F, 2B, 1F, 3B, 1F, 2B) x7, EF

WS – ACB

312 MC – Ch3, (1B, 1F, 2B, 6F, 2B, 1F, 1B, 8F) x7, 1B, 1F, 3B, ES

Come back next week for your next dose 😉

Don’t forget to update your Ravelry Project to be entered to win the weekly prize!

Abstract Queen CAL: Mosaic Part 13

November 24, 2020: Part 13 – Rows 289-312

Nina Mayer’s work in progress: part 13!

This week’s big news: Black Friday sale ALL WEEK LONG! Everything in my Ravelry and Etsy stores is 25% off! No code needed. Sale ends Nov 29, 2020!

Go back to the main Abstract Queen landing page if you want to find the interlocking version or the list of dates of each release. Scroll down to find the pattern.

Subscribe to receive weekly updates by email!

The free parts on the blog do not include the chart, but you can purchase the pattern on Ravelry or Etsy, where you will receive the chart and instructions for both techniques. I really appreciate the support!

Join my Ravelry group or Facebook group share your progress, no matter when you start! And create a project page on Ravelry linked to the Abstract Queen pattern to be entered to win one of the weekly prizes!

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Mosaic Key

MC = Main Color: blue in chart
CC = Contrasting Color: white in chart
Sp = space
Sk = skip a stitch
CH = chain
SC = single crochet
sc = SC into Back Loop only
DC = double crochet
dc = DC into Front Loop of stitch, 2 rows below
JS = Joining Stitch: insert hook under both loops, pull up a loop, slip stitch, SC in same space
ES = End Stitch: SC under both loops, CH 1, cut yarn and pull through tightly

Mosaic Technique

  • Remember to skip the same number of stitch(es) behind your dc(s) before doing your next sc
  • The front of your work is always facing you (this is the right side, the side showing the design)
  • You are always working from the right to the left
  • You tie on a new yarn at the beginning of each row and cut it at the end
    • Tails don’t need to be longer than an inch and a half
  • Yarn colors can be anything you like
    • They need to contrast well (try a black and white photo to see if they are too similar)
    • They need to be the same weight (size/thickness)
    • My charts use black as the Main Color and white as the Coordinating Color
  • I prefer using a chainless SC to create my foundation row because then I have tails on both sides of my work just like all the other rows will have
  • Even-numbered rows use MC; odd-numbered rows use CC
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Next part of the pattern begins here:

289 – JS, sc1, dc1, sc1, {dc1, sc5, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x12} x7, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x2, ES

290 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, {dc1, sc3, dc1, sc29, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2} x6, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc23, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

291 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x4, {dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x5, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x11} x7, (dc1, sc1) x2, ES

292 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc7, {dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc29} x7, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

293 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x8, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc5, {(dc1, sc1) x12, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc5} x6, (dc1, sc1) x10, ES

294 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc7, {dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc17} x7, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

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295 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x4, {dc1, sc5, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x12} x7, (dc1, sc1) x2, ES

296 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc19, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, {dc1, sc3, dc1, sc29, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2} x6, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc17, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

297 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x7, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x5, {dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x11, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x5} x6, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x10, ES

298 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, {dc1, sc29, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1} x6, dc1, sc23, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

299 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x11, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc5, {(dc1, sc1) x12, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc5} x6, (dc1, sc1) x7, ES

300 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc1, {dc1, sc3, dc1, sc17, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc1} x6, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc11, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

301 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x7, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc5, {(dc1, sc1) x12, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc5} x6, (dc1, sc1) x11, ES

302 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc25, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, {dc1, sc3, dc1, sc29, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2} x6, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc11, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

303 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x10, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x5, {dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x11, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x5} x6, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x7, ES

304 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc19, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, {dc1, sc29, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1} x6, dc1, sc17, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

305 – JS, sc1, dc1, sc3, {(dc1, sc1) x12, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc5} x7, (dc1, sc1) x4, ES

306 – JS, (dc1, sc1) x2, {dc1, sc17, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3} x7, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

307 – JS, sc1, (dc1, sc1) x10, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc5, {(dc1, sc1) x12, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc5} x6, (dc1, sc1) x8, ES

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308 – JS, (dc1, sc1) x2, {dc1, sc29, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3} x7, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

309 – JS, sc1, dc1, sc3, {(dc1, sc1) x11, dc1, sc5, (dc1, sc1) x5, dc1, sc5} x7, (dc1, sc1) x4, ES

310 – JS, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc25, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, {dc1, sc29, dc1, sc3, (dc1, sc1) x2, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1} x6, dc1, sc11, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

311 – JS, sc1, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc5, {(dc1, sc1) x12, dc1, sc5, dc1, sc7, dc1, sc5} x7, dc1, sc1, ES

312 – JS, (dc1, sc1) x3, {dc1, sc3, dc1, sc17, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, sc13, dc1, sc1} x7, dc1, sc3, dc1, sc1, dc1, ES

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